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  • Disasters and History
  • The Vulnerability and Resilience of Past Societies
  • Online publication date: October 2020
  • pp v-vi
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press

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Contents

  1. List of Figures

  2. List of Tables

  3. Preface

  4. 1Introduction: Disasters and History

    1. 1.1The Key Themes of the Book

    2. 1.2Disaster Studies and Disaster History: Connected Fields?

    3. 1.3Interpretative Frameworks in Historical Research

  5. 2Classifications and Concepts

    1. 2.1A Taxonomy of Disasters

    2. 2.2Scale and Scope of Disasters

    3. 2.3Concepts

      1. 2.3.1Disaster and Hazard

      2. 2.3.2The Disaster Management Cycle

      3. 2.3.3Vulnerability

      4. 2.3.4Resilience

      5. 2.3.5Adaptation, Transformation, and Transition

      6. 2.3.6Risk

  6. 3History as a Laboratory: Materials and Methods

    1. 3.1Historical Sources

      1. 3.1.1Types of Historical Sources

      2. 3.1.2Combining Historical Data with Sources from the Natural Sciences

      3. 3.1.3History and the Digital Age: Opportunities and Pitfalls for Historical Disaster Research

    2. 3.2Methodologies

      1. 3.2.1Hazard and Disaster Reconstruction from Historical Sources

      2. 3.2.2Vulnerability Assessment

      3. 3.2.3Comparative Methodologies

  7. 4Disaster Preconditions and Pressures

    1. 4.1Environmental and Climatic Pressures

    2. 4.2Technological, Infrastructural, and Economic Preconditions

      1. 4.2.1Technological and Infrastructural Preconditions and Pressures

      2. 4.2.2Economic Pressures and Crises

    3. 4.3Coordination Systems and Institutional Preconditions

      1. 4.3.1Coordination Systems: The Family, the Market, and the State

      2. 4.3.2Institutions for Collective Action and the Commons

    4. 4.4Social Pressures: Poverty, Inequality, and Social Distress

    5. 4.5Cultural Preconditions

  8. 5Disaster Responses

    1. 5.1Top-Down and Bottom-Up Responses

    2. 5.2Experience, Memory, Knowledge, and Experts

      1. 5.2.1Memory and Learning from Experience

      2. 5.2.2The ‘Rule of Experts’

    3. 5.3Constraints on Disaster Responses

      1. 5.3.1Inequalities in Power and Property

      2. 5.3.2Institutional Rigidity and Path Dependency

  9. 6Effects of Disasters

    1. 6.1Short-Term Effects

      1. 6.1.1Victims, Selective Mortality, and Population Recovery

      2. 6.1.2Land Loss and Capital Destruction

      3. 6.1.3Economic Crisis

      4. 6.1.4Scapegoating, Blame, and Social Unrest

    2. 6.2Societal Collapse

    3. 6.3Long-Term Effects

      1. 6.3.1Disasters as a Force for Good? Economic Effects

      2. 6.3.2Long-Term Demographic Changes

      3. 6.3.3Reconstruction, Reform, and Societal Change

      4. 6.3.4Economic Redistribution

  10. 7Past and Present

    1. 7.1Disaster History and/in the Anthropocene

      1. 7.1.1Climate Change

      2. 7.1.2Capitalism

      3. 7.1.3The Risk Society

    2. 7.2The Potential of History for Better Understanding Disasters

      1. 7.2.1The Historical Roots of Present-Day Disasters

      2. 7.2.2The Past as an Empirical Laboratory: Institutions and Social Context

      3. 7.2.3The Great Escape: Can History Teach Us How to Escape from Disaster?

    3. 7.3The Potential of Disasters for Historical Research

      1. 7.3.1Disasters as Historical Protagonists

      2. 7.3.2Disasters as Tests at the Extreme Margin

    4. 7.4Future Pathways

    5. 7.5A Final Word on Disaster Victims

  11. References

  12. Index