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Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes
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  • Cited by 1
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Online publication date: October 2010
  • Print publication year: 2010
  • First published in: 1859
  • Online ISBN: 9780511709364
  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511709364
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Book description

Thomas William Webb (1807–1885) was an Oxford-educated English clergyman whose deep interest in astronomy and accompanying field observations eventually led to the publication of his Celestial Objects for Common Telescopes in 1859. An attempt 'to furnish the possessors of ordinary telescopes with plain directions for their use, and a list of objects for their advantageous employment', the book was popular with amateur stargazers for many decades to follow. Underlying Webb's celestial field guide and directions on telescope use was a deep conviction that the heavens pointed observers 'to the most impressive thoughts of the littleness of man, and of the unspeakable greatness and glory of the Creator'. A classic and well-loved work by a passionate practitioner, the monograph remains an important landmark in the history of astronomy, as well as a tool for use by amateurs and professionals alike.

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