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  • Print publication year: 2019
  • Online publication date: August 2019

11 - The Futile Fourth Amendment: Understanding Police Excessive Force Doctrine Through an Empirical Assessment of Graham v. Connor

from Part III - The Law of Policing
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Summary

Recent social movements, such as Black Lives Matter, have forced racialized police violence into public view. While an entrenched problem for communities of color, police officers’ use of excessive force that maims or kills people of color briefly became visible in the media and public discourse due to protest and public mourning.