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The Architecture of the Christian Holy Land
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Book description

In the absence of the bodies of Christ and Mary, architecture took on a special representational role during the Christian Middle Ages, marking out sites associated with the bodily presence of the dominant figures of the religion. Throughout this period, buildings were reinterpreted in relation to the mediating role of textual and pictorial representations that shaped the pilgrimage experience across expansive geographies. In this study, Kathryn Blair Moore challenges fundamental ideas within architectural history regarding the origins and significance of European recreations of buildings in Jerusalem, Bethlehem, and Nazareth. From these conceptual foundations, she traces and re-interprets the significance of the architecture of the Holy Land within changing religious and political contexts, from the First Crusade and the emergence of the Franciscan Custody of the Holy Land to the anti-Islamic crusade movements of the Renaissance, as well as the Reformation.

Reviews

'Most significantly, Moore focuses on the varying perceptions about these architectural landmarks over time and the ways they were visualized in different artistic media. Well written, including ample notes, and illustrated with images. Highly Recommended.'

J. Pollini Source: Choice

'The book provides a first attempt at a general synthesis of a topic that was never discussed from a longue durée perspective. The author politely reacts against the tendency, still underlying many art-historical studies following a famous article by Richard Krautheimer, to consider all buildings that came to be described in medieval and early modern sources as inspired by or stemming directly from the Jerusalem Holy Sepulcher and other loca sancta churches as generic, symbolic, or basically inaccurate replicas of their archetypes.'

Michele Bacci Source: The American Historical Review

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