Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-fmrbl Total loading time: 0.251 Render date: 2022-09-26T12:41:32.056Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

twenty three - Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 January 2022

Get access

Summary

In this brief postscript, we reflect on some of the key policy insights to flow from this book's chapters. These empirical and theoretical insights have provided a detailed appraisal of a range of key disability and employment policies and have established the benefits and limitations of current policies. Given the broader objectives of translating new ideas into changing policy and practice the key policy points are laid out later in this chapter.

Working futures? makes clear both the continuities and changes that marked the shift from neo-Conservative to New Labour governments. A continued commitment to making welfare conditional upon certain types of active labour market behaviour characterises the links between these approaches. There is once again continuity between these political and policy responses to the challenge of employing more disabled people. However, the old distinctions between deserving and undeserving have been shifted to reflect the alterations to the ‘disability category’, which are at the heart of New Labour's dichotomous treatment of work for those who can and support for those who cannot. In practice, while this commits far more than governments of the 1980s and early 1990s, it does oversimplify the relationships between paid work, disability, impairment and perceptions of the value of paid work for disabled people.

While the Conservative governments of 1979-97 made efforts to distinguish between levels of support in terms of daily disability support (Disability Living Allowance mobility and care components), it has been New Labour that has looked more fully at the range of disability employment programmes with the aim of more targeted support.

There is evidence in this book's chapters that some policy and programme improvements have taken place, and these are clearly to be welcomed. Specifically, more flexible benefit linking rules, a less fragmented employment and benefits service and the mainstreaming of disability tax credits. The emphasis in WORKSTEP, the new supported employment programme is philosophically and practically on open as opposed to segregated or subsidised employment, this too has to be welcomed for many disabled people for whom this represents a further step towards social integration.

There are many continued limitations and concerns, however, about current disability and employment policy and programmes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Working Futures?
Disabled People, Policy and Social Inclusion
, pp. 329 - 334
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×