Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-qsmjn Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-19T00:15:18.877Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

9 - Small-vessel diseases of the brain

from Section 2 - Pathophysiology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2009

Lars-Olof Wahlund
Affiliation:
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm
Timo Erkinjuntti
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Serge Gauthier
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Get access

Summary

Small-vessel disease related to subcortical dementia is one of the main subtypes of the vascular dementia (VaD) syndrome. The early cognitive features of subcortical vascular dementia (SVD) are characterized by a dysexecutive syndrome with slowed information processing, usually mild memory deficit and behavioral symptoms. SVD incorporates two entities "the lacunar state" and "Binswanger's disease". Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) falls into the category of small-vessel diseases and contributes to the SVD syndrome. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is the most common form of hereditary small-vessel diseases leading to cognitive decline and dementia. Small-vessel diseases of the brain may also manifest in progressive visual impairment. Hereditary endotheliopathy with retinopathy, nephropathy and stroke (HERNS), cerebroretinal vasculopathy (CRV) and hereditary vascular retinopathy (HVR) were reported independently, but are different phenotypes in the same disease spectrum.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×