Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-84b7d79bbc-2l2gl Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-25T13:10:30.619Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

12 - Ultrasound as a tool in urodynamics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Demetri C Panayi
Affiliation:
St Helier Hospital
Vikram Khullar
Affiliation:
Imperial College London
Ranee Thakar
Affiliation:
St George’s University of London
Philip Toosz-Hobson
Affiliation:
Birmingham Women’s Hospital
Lucia Dolan
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Ultrasound of the bladder is commonly used in clinical practice as a non-invasive estimate of bladder volume when assessing post-void urinary residual. The advantages of ultrasound as a technique are that it is non-invasive, risk free and is easily applied and accessible when compared with traditional techniques, which are comparatively time consuming, invasive and involve exposure of the patient to X-rays.

Equipment

Two types of ultrasound equipment are available:

  1. □ dedicated bladder scanner: a mechanical sector probe to calculate a volume (although this may pick up artefact: any fluid-filled structure such as postnatal lochia or ovarian cyst)

  2. □ standard linear array transabdominal or transvaginal ultrasound: this estimates volume using an equation − height (cm) × width (cm) x depth/0.7 (cm). Estimated volume is unreliable at higher volumes because of a non-linear increase as urinary volume increases.

Indications for ultrasound in urodynamics

Bladder volume

Ultrasound can be used to measure bladder volume; for example, estimation of residual volume.

Urethral hypermobility

Ultrasound of the bladder neck can be used to assess urethral hypermobility (Figure 12.1). Increased bladder neck mobility is associated with stress urinary incontinence and can be measured ultrasonically using an X-Y coordinate system. The position of the bladder neck in terms of rotational angle and descent of the bladder neck can be determined (Figure 12.1). This method has a specificity of 83.1% and positive predictive value of 67.6% for urodynamic stress incontinence.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×