Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-84b7d79bbc-tsvsl Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-25T08:12:10.913Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

10 - Pad testing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Emmanuel Karantanis
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales
Ranee Thakar
Affiliation:
St George’s University of London
Philip Toosz-Hobson
Affiliation:
Birmingham Women’s Hospital
Lucia Dolan
Affiliation:
Belfast City Hospital
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Pad testing is most often used in the objective assessment of women with urinary incontinence. It involves the use of pre-weighed continence pads to capture urinary leakage over a period of time. The pads are then weighed to calculate the amount of leakage on completion of the test.

Why are pad tests performed?

Pad tests are most commonly used in the research setting:

  1. □ to provide objective confirmation of urinary incontinence before and after treatment

  2. □ to measure objectively the quantity of urine loss as a measure of severity: a 24-hour pad test loss of greater than 75 g represents severe incontinence in women with stress urinary incontinence1

  3. □ as a general aid when determining type of incontinence: women with pure stress urinary incontinence have been shown to leak less than 100 g in 24 hours and those with overactive bladder have more severe leakage;1 however, there is significant overlap, such that pad tests cannot be used to make an accurate diagnosis

  4. □ to help to differentiate between urine and vaginal discharge in women who may have excessive vaginal fluid loss: urinary incontinence is unlikely if less than 2 g of loss is found on a 24-hour pad test; such tests should not be conducted with panty liners, as they have a tendency to evaporate their fluid.

Types of pad test

There are several methods of pad testing which differ in duration of test, ranging between 1 hour and 72 hours, and in the activities undertaken during the test.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×