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10 - Biomaterials and Multifunctional Biocompatible Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD™) Technologies Transfer Pathway

From the Laboratory to the Market for Medical Devices and Prostheses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 July 2022

Orlando Auciello
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Dallas
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Summary

This chapter focus on a description of pathways undertaken to transfer the UNCD film technology from the laboratory into the market, through Original Biomedical Implants (OBI-USA) and OBI-México, founded by O. Auciello and colleagues. Topics discussed in this chapter include: 1) Summary of regulatory pathways in different regions of the worldfor approval of medical devices and prostheses; 2) description of pathway to bring to the market a UNCD-coated microchip (artificial retina) implantable inside the eye to restore partial vision to blind people), 2) description of the process to bring to the market a new generation of long life superior performance UNCD-coated prostheses (artificial hips, knees, dental implants, and more); 3) description of pathway to bring into the market a novel retina reattachment process using combined UNCD-coated magnet outside the eye and injection of super-paramagnetic nanoparticles inside the eye, pushing the retina backon to the inner eye’ layer, when attracted by the magnetic field created by the external magnet.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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