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Part II - Multilingualism and Intellectualisation of African Languages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Russell H. Kaschula
Affiliation:
Rhodes University, South Africa
H. Ekkehard Wolff
Affiliation:
Universität Leipzig
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Summary

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Chapter
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The Transformative Power of Language
From Postcolonial to Knowledge Societies in Africa
, pp. 83 - 206
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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