Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-5k9ck Total loading time: 1.041 Render date: 2022-06-26T14:55:29.471Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Part I - Mental Decolonisation and Cultural Diversity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 September 2020

Russell H. Kaschula
Affiliation:
Rhodes University, South Africa
H. Ekkehard Wolff
Affiliation:
Universität Leipzig
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
The Transformative Power of Language
From Postcolonial to Knowledge Societies in Africa
, pp. 31 - 82
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bunyan, J. 1866. Uhambo Lomhambi [The Pilgrim’s Progress]. Ed. and trans. Soga, Tiyo. Alice: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Defoe, D. 1719. Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. London: William Taylor.Google Scholar
Fitzpatrick, P. 1907. Jock of the Bushveld. South Africa: Longmans, Green & Co.Google Scholar
Haggard, R. H. 1887. She. London: Longmans.Google Scholar
Hamilton, M. 1909. The Story of Abraham Lincoln. London: T.C. & E.C. Jack.Google Scholar
Hofmeyr, I. 2004. The Portable Bunyan: A Transnational History of the Pilgrim’s Progress. Princeton: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hope, A. 1894. The Prisoner of Zenda. London: J.W. Arrowsmith.Google Scholar
Jordan, A. C. 1973. Towards an African Literature. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Liddicoat, A. J., & Bryant, P. 2002. Intellectualisation: A current issue in language planning. Current Issues in Language Planning 3(1): 1–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mbembe, A. J. 2016. Decolonising the university: New directions. Arts & Humanities in Higher Education 15(1): 29–45.Google Scholar
Mqhayi, S. E. K. 1907. ISamson. Alice and Lovedale: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Mqhayi, S. E. K. 2017. Iziganeko Zesizwe: Occasional Poems (1900–1943). Eds. and trans. Opland, Jeff and Mtuze, Peter T.. Pietermaritzburg: University of KwaZulu-Natal Press.Google Scholar
Nakhooda, M. 2017. Decolonised curriculum: A matter of mindfulness. Daily Maverick, 9 May. www.dailymaverick.co.za/opinionista/2017-05-09-decolonised-curriculum-a-matter-of-mindfulness/Google Scholar
Ndawo, H. M. 1909. Uhambo lukaGoboka. Alice and Lovedale: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Ndletyana, M. 2007. African Intellectuals in the 19th and Early 20th Century South Africa. Cape Town: HSRC Press.Google Scholar
Opland, J. 2007. (Ed. and trans.) The Nation’s Bounty: The Xhosa Poetry of Nontsizi Mgqwetho. Johannesburg: Wits University Press.Google Scholar
Ramani, E., Kekana, T., Modiba, M., & Joseph, M. 2007. Terminology development versus concept development through discourse: Insights from a dual-medium BA degree. Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies 25(2): 207–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Remmington, J., Willan, B., & Peterson, B. 2016. Sol Plaatje’s Native Life in South Africa: Past and Present. Johannesburg: Wits University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sinxo, G. B. 1922. UNomsa. Alice and Lovedale: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Sinxo, G. B. 1944. Umzali wolahleko. Alice and Lovedale: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Sinxo, G. B. 1960. Imfene kaDebeza. Cape Town: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sinxo, G. B. 1965. Umfundisi wase-Mthuqwai. Alice and Lovedale: Lovedale Press.Google Scholar
Soga, T. 1862. A national newspaper. Indaba 1(1): 9–11.Google Scholar
Van Eeden, J. 2013. Book review: Picturing change – curating visual culture at post-apartheid universities. De Arte 2013(88): 96–98.Google Scholar
Ngũgĩ, wa Thiong’o 1987. Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature. London: James Curry.Google Scholar
Young, A. S. 2014. Unpacking teachers’ language ideologies: Attitudes, beliefs, and practiced language policies in schools in Alsace, France. Language Awareness 23(1–2): 157–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Antia, B. & Dyers, C. 2017. Affirming the biliteracy of university students: Provision of multilingual lecture resources at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. In Palfreyman, D. M. & van der Walt, C. (eds.), Academic Biliteracies: Multilingual Repertoires in Higher Education. Bilingual Education & Bilingualism. Bristol: Multilingual Matters, pp. 113–141.Google Scholar
Baker, C. 2003. Biliteracy and Transliteracy in Wales: Language Planning and the Welsh National Curriculum. In Hornberger, N. H. (ed.). Continua of Biliteracy: An Ecological Framework for Education Policy, Research and Practice in Multilingual Settings. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 71–90.Google Scholar
Barris, K., & Miller, B. 2017. ‘To Open the Bright Doors’: Student Responses to Multilingual Learning Material. In Ralarala, M., Barris, K., Ivala, E., & Siyepu, S. (eds.). African Languages and Language Practice Research in the 21st Century: Interdisciplinary Themes and Perspectives. Cape Town: CASAS.Google Scholar
Blommaert, J. 2005. Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DOI 10.1017/CBO9780511610295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blommaert, J. 2010. The Sociolinguistics of Globalization. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blommaert, J. & Rampton, B. 2011. Language and Superdiversity: A Position Paper. Diversities, 13(2): 1–21.Google Scholar
Blommaert, J. & Rampton, B. 2012. Language and superdiversity. None (EN), 12: 1–36. Language and Globalisation. Retrieved 13 December 2017 from https://pure.uvt.nl/portal/en/publications/language-and-superdiversity(c3259170-2e6b-49b7-8641-990adc7bee7f).htmlGoogle Scholar
Bourdieu, P. 1977. The economics of linguistic exchanges. Social Science Information, 16(6): 645–668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bozalek, V., Garraway, J., & McKenna, S. 2011. Case Studies of Epistemological Access in Foundation/Extended Curriculum Programme Studies in South Africa. Cape Town: University of the Western Cape.Google Scholar
Canagarajah, A. S. 2007. Lingua franca English, multilingual communities, and language acquisition. Modern Language Journal, 91(focus issue): 923–939. DOI 10.1111/j.1540-4781.2007.00678.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Canagarajah, A. S. 2009. The plurilingual tradition and the English language in South Asia. AILA Review, 22(1): 5–22. DOI 10.1075/aila.22.02can.Google Scholar
Carstens, A. 2016. Translanguaging as a vehicle for L2 acquisition and L1 development: Students’ perceptions. Language Matters, 47(2): 55–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cobarrubias, J. 1983. Ethical issues in status planning. In Cobarrubias, J. & Fishman, J. (eds.), Language Planning: International Perspectives. Berlin: Mouton, pp. 41–85.Google Scholar
CPUT. 2007. Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Language Policy. www.cput.ac.za/policiesGoogle Scholar
CPUT. 2012. Cape Peninsula University of Technology. www.cput.ac.za/policiesGoogle Scholar
CPUT. 2017. Management Information System (MIS).Google Scholar
Crabtree, B. F. & Miller, W. L. (eds.). 1999. Doing Qualitative Research (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Creese, A. & Blackledge, A. 2010. Translanguaging in the bilingual classroom: A pedagogy for learning and teaching. Modern Language Journal, 94(1): 103–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, D. 1992. Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Language and Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
De Klerk, V. 2006. Codeswitching, borrowing and mixing in a corpus of Xhosa English. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 9(5): 597–614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Denzin, N. & Lincoln, Y. 2000. Handbook of Qualitative Research. London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
DHET. 2008. Report of the ministerial committee on transformation and social cohesion and the elimination of discrimination in public higher education institutions. Pretoria: Department of Education.Google Scholar
DoE. 1997. Education White Paper 3. A programme for higher education transformation. Retrieved 7 August 2015 from http://education.pwv.gov.za/index.asp?src=docuandxsrc=legi.Google Scholar
DoE. 2001. Education White Paper 6. A programme for higher education transformation. Retrieved 7 August 2015 from http://education.pwv.gov.za/index.asp?src=docuandxsrc=legi.Google Scholar
DoE. 2002. Language Policy for Higher Education. Pretoria: Government Printers.Google Scholar
DoE. 2003. Development of Indigenous Languages as Mediums of Instruction in Higher Education. Pretoria: Government Printers.Google Scholar
García, O. 2009. Bilingual Education in the 21st Century: A Global Perspective. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
García, O. 2011. From language garden to sustainable languaging: Bilingual education in a global world. Perspectives, 34(1): 5–9.Google Scholar
García, O. & Sylvan, C. 2011. Pedagogies and practices in multilingual classrooms: Singularities in pluralities. Modern Language Journal, 95(3): 385–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fataar, A. 2018. Placing the students at the centre of the decolonizing imperative: Engaging the (mis)recognition struggles of students at the post-apartheid university. Educational Studies, 54(3): 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fricker, M. 2007. Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press. DOI 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198237907.001.0001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
García, O., & Wei, L. 2014. Translanguaging: Language, Biliteracy, and Education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. & Martin, J. R. 1993. Writing Science: Literacy and Discursive Power. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.Google Scholar
Heleta, S. 2016. Decolonisation of higher education: Dismantling epistemic violence and Eurocentrism in South Africa. Transformation in Higher Education 1(1): a9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heller, M. 2007. Bilingualism as ideology and practice. In Heller, M. (ed.), Bilingualism: A Social Approach – Palgrave Advances in Linguistics. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heller, M. 2008. Bourdieu and ‘literacy education’. In Albright, J. & Luke, A. (eds.), Pierre Bourdieu and Literacy Education. New York: Routledge, pp. 50–67.Google Scholar
Heugh, K. 2009. Contesting the monolingual practices of a bilingual to multilingual policy. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 8(2): 96–113.Google Scholar
Hibbert, L. & Van der Walt, C. (eds.). 2014. Multilingual Universities in South Africa: Reflecting Society in Higher Education. Bristol: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 1989. Continua of biliteracy. Review of Educational Research, 59(3): 271–296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 1990. Creating successful learning contexts for bilingual literacy. Teachers College Record, 92(2): 212–229.Google Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 2000. Multilingual literacies, literacy practices and the continua of biliteracy. In Martin-Jones, M. and Jones, K. (eds.), Multilingual Literacies: Reading and Writing Different Worlds. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 353–367.Google Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 2003. Multilingual language policies and the continua of biliteracy: An ecological approach. In Hornberger, N. H. (Ed.), Continua of Biliteracy: An Ecological Framework for Educational Policy, Research, and Practice in Multilingual Settings. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 315–339.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 2007. Multilingual language policies and the continua of biliteracy: An ecological approach. In García, O. & Baker, C. (eds.), Bilingual Education: An Introductory Reader. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 177–194.Google Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. 2008. Continua of biliteracy. In Creese, A., Martin, P., & Hornberger, N. H. (eds.), Encyclopaedia of Language and Education: Vol. 9. Ecology of Language (2nd ed.). Boston: Springer Science+Business Media, pp. 275–290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. & Skilton-Sylvester, E. 2000. Revisiting the continua of literacy: International and critical perspectives. Language and Education: An International Journal, 14(2): 96–122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. & Skilton-Sylvester, E. 2003. Revisiting the continua of literacy: International and critical perspectives. In Hornberger, N. H. (ed.), Continua of Biliteracy: An Ecological Framework for Educational Policy, Research and Practice in Multilingual Settings. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 35–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hornberger, N. H. & Link, H. 2012. Translanguaging and transnational literacies in multilingual classrooms: A biliteracy lens. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 15(3): 261–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jørgenson, J. N. 2008. Polylingual languaging around and among children and adolescents. International Journal of Multilingualism, 5(3): 161–176. DOI 10.1080/14790710802387562.Google Scholar
Madiba, M. 2013. Multilingual education in South African universities: Policies, pedagogy and practicality. Linguistics and Education, 24(4): 385–395.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Makalela, L. 2013. Black South African English on the Radio. World Englishes, 32(1): 93–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Makalela, L. 2015. Translanguaging as a Vehicle for Epistemic Access: Cases for Reading Comprehension and Multilingual Interaction. Per Linguam, 31(1): 15–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Makoni, S., & Mashiri, P. 2007. Critical historiography: Does language planning in Africa need a construct of language as part of its theoretical apparatus? In Makoni, S. & Pennycook, A. (eds.), Disinventing and Reconstituting Languages. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters, pp. 62–89.Google Scholar
Marilyn-Jones, M. & Jones, K. (eds.). 2000. Multilingual Literacies: Reading and Writing Different Worlds. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.Google Scholar
Mayer, R. E. 2008. Multimedia Learning. New York & Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Mbembe, A. J. 2001. On the Postcolony. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Mbembe, A. J. 2016. Decolonizing the university: New directions. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 15(1): 29–45.Google Scholar
McKaiser, E. 2016. Epistemic injustices: The dark side of academic freedom. 2016 DCS Oosthuizen Academic Freedom Memorial Lecture, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 30 May. Retrieved 23 November 2017 from www.iol.co.za/news/epistemic-injustices-the-dark-side-of-academic-freedom-2029747.Google Scholar
McKinney, C. 2014. Anglonormativity and what counts as English in South African suburban schools. Paper presented at Symposium on ‘The (in)visibility of children’s linguistic and cultural resources in education in African contexts’. AILA World Congress Brisbane, 10–15 August.Google Scholar
McKinney, C. 2017. Language and Power in Post-Colonial Schooling: Ideologies in Practice. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
McKinney, C., Carrim, H., Marshall, A., & Layton, L. 2015. What counts as language in South African schooling? Monoglossic ideologies and children’s participation. AILA Review, 28: 103–126. DOI 10.1075/aila.28.05mck.Google Scholar
Merriam, S. 1988. Case Study in Education: A Qualitative Approach. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Molefe, T. O. 2016. Oppression must fall: South Africa’s revolution in theory. World Policy Journal, 33(1): 30–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ngũgĩ, wa Thiong’o. 1986. Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature. London: James Currey.Google Scholar
Paltridge, B. & Starfield, S. (eds.). 2013. The Handbook of English for Special Purposes (1st ed.). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
PanSALB Board Notice 54 of 1999. PANSALB’s position on the promotion of multilingualism in South Africa: A draft discussion document. Retrieved 18 April 2016 from www.polity.org.za/polity/govdocs/discuss/pansalb.html.Google Scholar
Parkinson, J., Jackson, L., Kirkwood, T., & Padayachee, V. 2007. A scaffolded reading and writing course for foundation level science students. English for Specific Purposes, 26(4): 443–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pavlenko, A. & Blackledge, A. 2004. Negotiation of Identities in Multilingual Contexts. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Paxton, M. & Tyam, N. 2010. Xhosalising English? Negotiating meaning and identity in Economics. South African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies, 28(3): 247–257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pennycook, A. & Otsuji, E. 2014. Metrolingual multi-tasking and spatial repertoires: ‘Pizza mo two minutes coming’. Journal of Sociolinguistics 18(2): 161–184. DOI 10.1111/josl.12079.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ralarala, M. K., Pineteh, A., & Mchiza, Z. 2016. A case study on the language and socio-cultural challenges experienced by international students studying at Cape Peninsula University of Technology’. South African Journal of Higher Education, 30(4): 233–257.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ramoupi, N. L. L. 2014a. African languages policy in the education of South Africa: 20 years of freedom of subjugation. JHEA/RESA, 12(2): 53–93.Google Scholar
Ramoupi, N. L. L. 2014b. African research and scholarship: 20 years of lost opportunities to transform higher education in South Africa. Ufahamu: A Journal of African Studies, 38(1): 269–286.Google Scholar
Rampton, B. 2011. From ‘multi-ethnic adolescent heteroglossia’ to ‘contemporary urban vernaculars’. Language and Communication, 31: 276–294. DOI 10.1016/j.langcom.2011.01.001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Republic of South Africa. Department of Higher Education and Training. 2001. Language Policy Framework for South African Higher Education.Google Scholar
Republic of South Africa. Parliament of South Africa. 2011. South African Language Bill.Google Scholar
Rodrigues, T. R. 2017. Transcending solely print-based texts through blogging – A multimodal approach. In Dhunpath, R., Amin, N., & Khumalo, L. (eds.), Alternation, 24(2). Durban: UKZN, pp. 167–190.Google Scholar
Rodrigues, T. R. & Abrahams, A. 2017. Improving reading comprehension skills of first-year electrical engineering students – A community translation approach. In Ralarala, M. K., Barris, K., Ivala, E., & Siyepu, S. (eds.), Interdisciplinary Themes and Perspectives in African Language Research in the 21st Century. Cape Town: CASAS Publishers, pp. 35–56.Google Scholar
Sardar, Z. 2008. The Language of Equality: A Discussion Paper on Equality and Human Rights Commission. Manchester: Arndale House.Google Scholar
Scott, I. 2009. First-year experience as terrain of failure or platform for development? Critical choices for higher education. In Leibowitz, B., van der Merwe, A., & van Schalkwyk, S. (Eds.), Focus on First-Year Success: Perspectives Emerging from South Africa and Beyond. Stellenbosch: Sun Media, pp. 17–35.Google Scholar
Sebba, M. 2007. Spelling and Society. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shank, G. 2002. Qualitative Research: A Personal Skills Approach. Upper Saddle River: Merrill Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Snow, C. E. & Uccelli, P. 2009. The challenge of academic language. In Olson, D. R. & Torrance, N. (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Literacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 112–133.Google Scholar
Stroud, C. & Kerfoot, C. 2013. Towards rethinking multilingualism and language policy for academic literacies. Linguistics and Education, 24(4): 396–405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Lier, L. 2004. The semiotics and ecology of language learning: Perception, voice, identity and democracy. Utbildning & Demokrati, 13(3): 79–103.Google Scholar
Ward, J. 2001. EST: Evading scientific text. English for Specific Purposes, 20(2): 141–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolff, H. E. 2016. Language and Development in Africa: Perceptions, Ideologies and Challenges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yin, R. 2009. Case Study Research: Design and Methods (4th ed.). London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Blum, S. 1997. Naming practices and the power of words in China. Language in Society, 26(3): 357–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bowerman, M. & Levinson, S. C. 2001. Introduction. In Bowerman, M. & Levinson, S. C. (eds.), Language Acquisition and Conceptual Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chomsky, N. 1965. Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Engel, R. & Schutt, R. K. 2013. The Practice of Research in Social Work. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
Fitzpatrick, B. A. 2012. African names and naming practices: The impact slavery and European domination had on the African psyche, identity and protest. MA Thesis. Ohio State University. https://etd.ohiolink.edu/rws_etd/document/get/osu1338404929/inline (accessed 3 April 2018).Google Scholar
Gleitman, L. & Papafragou, A. 1997. Language and thought. In Holyoak, K. J. & Morrison, R. G. (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 351–370.Google Scholar
Gustafsson Sendén, M., Bäck, E. A., & Lindqvist, A. 2015. Introducing a gender-neutral pronoun in a natural gender language: The influence of time on attitudes and behavior. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 893. DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00893.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heleta, S. 2016. Decolonisation of higher education: Dismantling epistemic violence and Eurocentrism in South Africa. Transformation in Higher Education. www.thejournal.org.za/index.php/thejournal/article/view/9. (accessed 20 February 2018). DOI 10.4102/the.v1i1.9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herbert, R. K. 1997. The politics of personal naming in South Africa. A Journal of Onomastics, 45(1): 3–17.Google Scholar
Howard, K. M. 2011. Language socialization and hierarchy. In Duranti, A., Ochs, E., & Schieffelin, B. B. (eds.), The Handbook of Language Socialization. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. DOI 10.1002/9781444342901.ch15.Google Scholar
Neethling, B. 2003. Perceptions around the English name of Xhosa speakers. Nomina Africana, 17(2): 47–65.Google Scholar
Ngubane, S. & Thabethe, N. 2013. Shifts and continuities in Zulu personal naming practices. Literator, 34(1): 1–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ochs, E. 2000. Socialization. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, 9(1–2): 230–233.Google Scholar
Pederson, E. D., Wilkins, D., Levinson, S., Kita, S., & Senft, G. 1998. Semantic typology and spatial conceptualization. Language, 74(1998): 557–589.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sczesny, S., Formanowicz, M., & Moser, F. 2016. Can gender-fair language reduce gender stereotyping and discrimination? Frontiers in Psychology, 7: 25. DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00025.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Slobin, D. I. 1996. From ‘Thought and Language’ to ‘Thinking for Speaking’. In Gumpertz, J. J. & Levinson, S. C. (eds.), Rethinking Linguistic Relativity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 70–96.Google Scholar
Snail, M. 2011. Revisiting aspects of language in South Africa during the apartheid era. Historia Actual Online, 24: 65–91.Google Scholar
Suzman, S. M. 1994. Names as pointers: Zulu personal naming practices. Language in Society, 23(2): 253–272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
VanPatten, Bill & Benati, Allesandro G. 2010. Key Terms in Second Language Acquisition. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
https://twitter.com/Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×