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14 - Plasticity after brain lesions

from Section A3 - Plasticity after injury to the CNS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2012

Randolph J. Nudo
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
Ines Eisner-Janowicz
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
Ann M. Stowe
Affiliation:
Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
Michael Selzer
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Stephanie Clarke
Affiliation:
Université de Lausanne, Switzerland
Leonardo Cohen
Affiliation:
National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland
Pamela Duncan
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Fred Gage
Affiliation:
Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
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Summary

Introduction

Throughout this century, neuroscientists have attempted to understand the neurological bases for functional recovery after brain injury (Ogden and Franz, 1917). But until a few years ago neural models were based on poorly understood processes such as diaschisis and substitution (Bach-y-Rita, 1987). At least short-term recovery from cortical injury probably involves the resolution of acute pathophysiologic processes in and around the site of injury. However, since improvement in motor abilities can continue for months, other mechanisms must play a role.

Neurophysiologic studies in animals and neuroimaging and non-invasive stimulation studies in humans over the past 10–15 years have begun to shed light on the neurological bases of motor recovery in greater detail. A common theme in many of these recent studies is that the cerebral cortex undergoes significant alterations in functional organization after peripheral and central nervous system injury, and after specific behavioral experiences (Merzenich et al., 1983; Donoghue and Sanes, 1987; Jenkins and Merzenich, 1987; Kaas et al., 1990; Chollet et al., 1991; Grafton et al., 1992; Nudo et al., 1992; 1996a; Cohen et al., 1993; Recanzone et al., 1993; Pascual-Leone et al., 1995; Seitz et al., 1995; Elbert et al., 1997; Karni et al., 1998; Kleim et al., 1998, and see Volume I, Chapter 8). The high level of interest in these plasticity studies stems from the assumption that the time course and extent of functional recovery is related to the time course and extent of cortical remodeling.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Plasticity after brain lesions
    • By Randolph J. Nudo, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ines Eisner-Janowicz, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ann M. Stowe, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
  • Edited by Michael Selzer, University of Pennsylvania, Stephanie Clarke, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland, Leonardo Cohen, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Pamela Duncan, University of Florida, Fred Gage, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
  • Book: Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation
  • Online publication: 05 March 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545061.017
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  • Plasticity after brain lesions
    • By Randolph J. Nudo, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ines Eisner-Janowicz, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ann M. Stowe, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
  • Edited by Michael Selzer, University of Pennsylvania, Stephanie Clarke, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland, Leonardo Cohen, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Pamela Duncan, University of Florida, Fred Gage, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
  • Book: Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation
  • Online publication: 05 March 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545061.017
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Plasticity after brain lesions
    • By Randolph J. Nudo, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ines Eisner-Janowicz, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA, Ann M. Stowe, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA
  • Edited by Michael Selzer, University of Pennsylvania, Stephanie Clarke, Université de Lausanne, Switzerland, Leonardo Cohen, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Pamela Duncan, University of Florida, Fred Gage, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, San Diego
  • Book: Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation
  • Online publication: 05 March 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545061.017
Available formats
×