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Chapter 32 - Enhanced recovery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

Jane Sturgess
Affiliation:
Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge
Jane Sturgess
Affiliation:
Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge
Justin Davies
Affiliation:
Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge
Kamen Valchanov
Affiliation:
Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
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Summary

The enhanced recovery project has been embraced by almost all surgical specialties. The programme purports to offer benefits to all end users. What is apparent is that it involves, and requires engagement of every person involved in the patient pathway. The success of the programme does not exclude the patient nor their care-givers.

Proposed benefits of employing an enhanced recovery programme

General practice

  • Closer working relationships between the acute and primary care sectors – with recognition of good care from local commissioning groups

  • Family physician able to start the process of preparation for surgery, and get ready to receive the patient back with good information post-operatively

Patient

  • More involved in their care

  • Earlier return to home and/or work

  • Purported to have less exposure to hospital-acquired infection, and lower complication rates post-operatively

Staff

  • Education and training

  • Implementation of technology to support care

  • Sense of achievement and recognition about providing excellent care with reduced lengths of stay, and improved patient experience

Quality

  • Allegedly improved clinical outcomes, faster detection of complications and standard care across the UK

  • It is certainly something that can be measured by both hospital mangers and inspecting bodies

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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References

Department of Health. Delivering Enhanced Recovery. Helping patients to get better sooner after surgery. Enhanced recovery partnership programme. London: Department of Health, 2010.

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