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2 - Introduction to stated preference models and methods

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Jordan J. Louviere
Affiliation:
University of Sydney
David A. Hensher
Affiliation:
University of Sydney
Joffre D. Swait
Affiliation:
University of Florida
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Summary

Introduction

This chapter provides the basic framework for stated preference (SP) and stated choice (SC) methods. We first provide a brief rationale for developing and applying SP theory and methods. Then we briefly overview the history of the field. The bulk of attention in this chapter is devoted to an introduction to experimental design, with special reference to SP theory and methods. The next and subsequent chapters deal specifically with the design of (stated) choice experiments, which are briefly introduced in this chapter.

Let us begin by discussing the rationale for the design and analysis of stated preference and choice surveys. By ‘survey’ we mean any form of data collection involving the elicitation of preferences and/or choices from samples of respondents. These could be familiar ‘paper and pencil’ type surveys or much more elaborate multimedia events with full motion video, graphics, audio, etc., administered to groups of respondents in central locations or single respondents using advanced computerised interviewing technology. The type of ‘survey’ is dictated by the particular application: relatively simple products which are well known to virtually all respondents usually can be studied with familiar survey methods, whereas complex, new technologies with which most respondents are unfamiliar may require complex, multimedia approaches.

Type
Chapter
Information
Stated Choice Methods
Analysis and Applications
, pp. 20 - 33
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2000

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