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Part II - GIS Analysis in Fine-Scale Space

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 January 2021

Francine L. Dolins
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Dearborn
Christopher A. Shaffer
Affiliation:
Grand Valley State University, Michigan
Leila M. Porter
Affiliation:
Northern Illinois University
Jena R. Hickey
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Nathan P. Nibbelink
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
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Spatial Analysis in Field Primatology
Applying GIS at Varying Scales
, pp. 121 - 306
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

References

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