Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-2bkkj Total loading time: 0.223 Render date: 2022-09-26T04:34:08.722Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

eight - Rewriting the contract? Conditionality, welfare reform and the rights and responsibilities of disabled people

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2022

John Hudson
Affiliation:
University of York
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The ongoing shift from the so-called ‘passive’ welfare state of the past to the ‘active’ welfare state of today (Walters, 1997) and the conditionality at the heart of welfare state reform within and beyond Europe have generated extensive discussion (for example, Cox, 1998; Dwyer, 1998, 2004; Goul Andersen et al, 2002; Deacon, 2005; Dean et al, 2005; Wright, 2012). Central to this shift has been a requirement that certain groups of disabled citizens who had previously enjoyed access to largely unconditional social security benefits due to sickness and impairment should now become ‘responsible’ active agents in their own welfare by seeking or preparing for paid work, rather than relying on social security benefits. The rolling-out of a principle of conditionality, which holds that eligibility to certain basic, publicly provided welfare entitlements should be dependent on an individual's first agreeing to meet particular compulsory duties or patterns of behaviour (Deacon, 1994) has been one way in which UK governments of various political persuasions have sought to rewrite ‘the terms and conditions of the welfare contract’ (Buck et al, 2006, p 1).

Commentators have highlighted the links between contemporary forms of conditionality and the founding principles of the British welfare state, in which the interrelationship between social security and the social contractual obligations of individual citizens were made explicit in the Beveridge Report (1942) (Freud, 2007; DWP, 2008). However, it is apparent that there has been an intensification of conditionality in many Western welfare states in recent decades, with enhanced use of sanctions and realigned relationships between entitlement, conduct and support (Handler, 2004; Betzelt and Bothfeld, 2011). In the UK these new forms of conditionality seek to limit the rights of social citizenship (Marshall, 1950) by increasing the conditional requirements of welfare access in respect of disability-, incapacity- and unemployment-related welfare benefits (Dwyer, 1998; DWP, 2008; Gregg, 2008; Griggs and Evans, 2010; Patrick, 2011; Rolfe, 2012), as well as in the fields of housing, homelessness (King, 2004; Johnsen and Fitzpatrick, 2010; Flint et al, 2011; HM Government, 2011) and migration (Dwyer, 2010).

Type
Chapter
Information
Social Policy in an Era of Competition
From Global to Local Perspectives
, pp. 135 - 148
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2017

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×