Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-vpsfw Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-23T08:19:34.406Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

1. - Critical Studies

from The Year’s Contribution To Shakespeare Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 August 2022

Emma Smith
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Get access

Summary

Following the pulling down of the statue of slave-trader, Edward Colston, in Bristol in the summer of 2020, in response to the Black Lives Matter movement, the historian David Olusoga observed, ‘the problem isn’t the statue; it’s the pedestal’. At a similar moment, the question of Shakespeare’s function as a potential symbol of racial oppression encouraged Ayanna Thompson to ask the question, ‘Is Shakespeare a statue?’ Some of the most valuable scholarship in Shakespeare produced this year asks directly or obliquely what kind of oppressive function Shakespeare-as-statue serves, and interrogates the kind of pedestals which have placed him there.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey 75
Othello
, pp. 361 - 374
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Works Reviewed

Acker, Faith D., First Readers of Shakespeare’s Sonnets, 1590–1790 (New York and London, 2021)Google Scholar
Barnes, Todd Landon, Shakespearean Charity and the Perils of Redemptive Performance (Cambridge, 2020)Google Scholar
Craik, Katharine, ed., Shakespeare and Emotion (Cambridge, 2020)Google Scholar
Edmondson, Paul, and Wells, Stanley, eds., All the Sonnets of Shakespeare (Cambridge, 2020)Google Scholar
Gilchrist, Kim, Staging Britain’s Past: Pre-Roman Britain in Early Modern Drama (London and New York, 2021)Google Scholar
Ivic, Christopher, The Subject of Britain, 1603–25 (Manchester, 2020)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Knecht, Ross, The Grammar Rules of Affection: Passion and Pedagogy in Sidney, Shakespeare and Jonson (Toronto, Buffalo, London, 2021)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McInnis, David, Shakespeare and Lost Plays (Cambridge, 2021)Google Scholar
Razzall, Lucy, Boxes and Books in Early Modern England: Materiality, Metaphor, Containment (Cambridge, 2021)Google Scholar
Thompson, Ayanna ed., The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Race (Cambridge, 2021)Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×