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7 - Post-expansion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Emanuel A. Schegloff
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
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Summary

It is the import of the conditional relevance of a second pair part given the recognizable occurrence of a first that a sequence cannot be possibly complete after a first pair part but before its second pair part. A sequence can end there – as, for example, when someone storms out of a room abruptly – but one major component of “abruptness” can be just this: ending the sequence before its recognizable closure. In this respect, a sequence is like a turn, a conversation, or any other recognizably structured unit which does not just end, but has a recognizable form of closure (Schegloff and Sacks, 1973).

With the production of a second pair part this constraint on sequence completion is met, and some sequences are recognizably complete (to their participants and to other observers) at the end of the second pair part turn. This is commonly the case with sequences which have no preference structure, such as greetings and leave-takings or “bye-byes.” Although on occasion a third or fourth offering may be made to such sequences (especially if the first round was done in overlap), commonly enough a first and second greeting (or “bye bye”) complete the exchange.

Beyond that, under a range of circumstances – for some sequence types, in some contexts, for some types of response – the parties may treat the occurrence of a second pair part as the end of the sequence, and embody this by going on to a new sequence or allowing the talk to lapse.

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Chapter
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Sequence Organization in Interaction
A Primer in Conversation Analysis
, pp. 115 - 168
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

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  • Post-expansion
  • Emanuel A. Schegloff, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Sequence Organization in Interaction
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511791208.008
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  • Post-expansion
  • Emanuel A. Schegloff, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Sequence Organization in Interaction
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511791208.008
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Post-expansion
  • Emanuel A. Schegloff, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Book: Sequence Organization in Interaction
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511791208.008
Available formats
×