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Part IV - Basic Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 December 2018

Allison B. Kaufman
Affiliation:
University of Connecticut
Meredith J. Bashaw
Affiliation:
Franklin and Marshall College, Pennsylvania
Terry L. Maple
Affiliation:
Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens
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Scientific Foundations of Zoos and Aquariums
Their Role in Conservation and Research
, pp. 475 - 645
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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