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Part III - Issues in cross-national comparisons

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 April 2016

Peter K. Smith
Affiliation:
Goldsmiths, University of London
Keumjoo Kwak
Affiliation:
Seoul National University
Yuichi Toda
Affiliation:
Osaka Kyoiku University, Japan
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School Bullying in Different Cultures
Eastern and Western Perspectives
, pp. 209 - 298
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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