Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-fcmtc Total loading time: 1.257 Render date: 2022-01-29T07:01:56.992Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Part II - Playing with Belief and Performance in Ancient Societies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2017

Colin Renfrew
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Iain Morley
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Michael Boyd
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Aveni, A., 2005. Observations on the pecked designs and other figures carved on the south platform of the pyramid of the sun at Teotihuacan. Journal for the History of Astronomy 36(122), 3147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, J., 1988. The Power of Myth, New York: Random House.Google Scholar
Christenson, A., 2003. Popol Vuh: The Sacred Book of the Maya. Winchester, England: O Books.Google Scholar
Coe, M., 1973. The Maya Scribe and His World. New York: Grolier Club.Google Scholar
Eppich, K., 2011. Lineage and State at El Perú-Waka’: Ceramic and Architectural Perspectives on the Classic Maya Social Dynamic. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Southern Methodist University.
Finamore, D. & Houston, S., 2010. Fiery Pool: The Maya and the Mythic Sea. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Freidel, D. A., Masson, M. & Rich, M., 2016. Imagining a complex Maya political economy: Counting Tokens and currencies in Image, Text and the Archaeological Record. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 27(1), 29–54.
Freidel, D. A. & Rich, M.,2015. Pecked circles and divining boards: calculating instruments in ancient Mesoamerica. In Cosmology, Calendars, and Horizon-Based Astronomy in Ancient Mesoamerica, eds. Dowd, A. & Milbrath, S.. Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 249–64.Google Scholar
Freidel, D. A., Rich, M. & Reilly, F. K. III, 2010. Resurrecting the Maize King. Archaeology 63(5), 42–5.Google Scholar
Freidel, D. A., Schele, L. & Parker, J., 1993. Maya Cosmos: Three Thousand Years on the Shamans’ Path. New York: William Morrow & Co. Inc.Google Scholar
Grube, N., & Nahm, W., 1994. A census of Xibalba: a complete inventory of way characters on Maya ceramics, in The Maya Vase Book, Vol. 4., eds. Kerr, B. & Kerr, J.. New York: Kerr Associates, 686715.Google Scholar
Guenter, S., 2007. On the Emblem Glyph of El Peru. The PARI Journal 8(2), 20–3.Google Scholar
Halperin, C. T., 2014. Maya Figurines: Intersections between State and Household. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Houston, S. D. & Stuart, D., 1989. The Way Glyph: Evidence for ‘Co-essences’ among the Classic Maya. Research Reports on Ancient Maya Writing 30. Washington, DC.: Center for Maya Research.Google Scholar
Inomata, T., 2006. Plazas, performers, and spectators: political theatres of the Classic Maya. Current Anthropology 47(5), 805–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, D., 2012. Approaching the End: Royal Ritual in the Palace Group at El Perú-Waka´, Petén, Guatemala. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, Southern Methodist University.Google Scholar
Lee, D. F. & Guenter, S. P., 2010. Ballgame panels from El Perú-Waka’ in regional perspective. Paper presented at the 75th Anniversary Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, 14–18 April, St. Louis MO.
Marken, D., 2011. City and State: Urbanism, Rural Settlement, and Polity in the Classic Maya Lowlands. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Southern Methodist University.Google Scholar
Martin, S., 2000. Nuevos datos epigraficos sobre la guerra Maya del clasico, in La Guerra entre los Antiguos Mayas: Memorias de la Primera Mesa Redondo de Palenque 1995, ed. Trejo, S.. Mexico City: INAH, 105–24.Google Scholar
Meléndez, J. C., 2007. Excavaciones en la Plaza 4 del Sito Arqueológico El Perú, Petén: Cronología y Función. Unpublished Licenciatura Thesis, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala.Google Scholar
Miller, M. E., & Houston, S. D., 1987. The classic Maya ballgame and its architectural setting: a study in relations between text and image. RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics 14, 4766.Google Scholar
Navarro-Farr, O. C., 2009. Ritual, Process, and Continuity in the Late to Terminal Classic Transition: Investigations at Structure M13-1 in the Ancient Maya Site of El Perú-Waka’, Petén, Guatemala. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Southern Methodist University.Google Scholar
Navarro-Farr, O. C., Freidel, D. A. & Arroyave Prera, A. L., 2008. Manipulating memory in the wake of dynastic decline at El Perú-Waka’: Termination at abandoned Structure M13-1. In Ruins of the Past: The Use and Perception of Abandoned Structures in the Maya Lowlands, eds. Stanton, T. W. & Magnoni, A., Boulder: University Press of Colorado, 113–46.Google Scholar
Navarro-Farr, O. C., Pérez Robles, G. & Menéndez Bolaños, D., 2012. Operación 1: Excavaciones en la Estructura M13-1. In Proyecto Regional Arqueológico El Perú-Waka’: Informe No. 10, Temporada 2012, ed. Pérez, J. C.. Report presented to the Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Guatemala, 391.Google Scholar
Navarro-Farr, O. & Rich, M. (eds.), 2014. Archaeology at El Perú-Waka’: Ancient Maya Performances of Ritual, Memory and Power. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
Perez Robles, G., 2003. ES: Excavaciones de Sondeo en las Plazas 1, 2, 3, y 4. In Proyecto Regional Arqueológico El Perú-Waka’: Informe No. 1, Temporada 2003, eds. H. Escobedo and D. Freidel. Report presented to the Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Guatemala, 257–82.Google Scholar
Rich, M., 2009. Refuse or Ritual? An Examination of the Problematic Deposit of Artifacts in the Tomb Fill of Burial 39, El Perú-Waka’, Guatemala. Paper presented at the 74th Annual Meeting for the Society for American Archaeology, Atlanta, GA.
Rich, M., 2011. Ritual, Royalty and Classic Period Politics: The Archaeology of the Mirador Group at El Perú-Waka’, Petén, Guatemala. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Southern Methodist University.Google Scholar
Rich, M., Freidel, D., Reilly, F. K. III & Eppich, E. K., 2010. An Olmec-style figurine from El Perú-Waka’, Petén, Guatemala: a preliminary report. Mexicon 17(5), 115–22.Google Scholar
Rich, M, Matute, V. & Piehl, J., 2007. WK-11: Excavaciones en la Estructura O14-04. In Proyecto Arqueológico El Perú-Waka’: Informe No. 4, Temporada 2006, eds. Escobedo, H. L. & Freidel, D. A.. Report presented to the Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Guatemala City, 217–57.Google Scholar
Rich, M., Piehl, J. & Matute, V., 2006. WK-11A: Continuación de las Excavaciones en el Complejo Mirador, Estructura O14-04. In Proyecto Arqueológico El Perú-Waka’: Informe No. 3, Temporada 2005, eds. Escobedo, H. L. & Freidel, D.. Report presented to the Instituto de Antropología e Historia, Guatemala City, 225–74.Google Scholar
Robles Castellanos, F. & Andrew, A. P., 2003. Proyecto Costa Maya: reconocimiento arqueologico de la esquina noroeste de la peninsula de Yucatan, in Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueologicas en Guatemala (2003). Guatemala: Ministerio de Cultura y Deportes; Instituto de Antropologia e Historia, 4766.Google Scholar
Schele, L. & Freidel, D., 1990. A Forest of Kings, the Untold Story of the Ancient Maya. New York: William Morrow & Co. Inc.Google Scholar
Soustelle, J. 1964. Daily Life of the Aztecs. Harmondsworth: Pelican.Google Scholar
Stanton, T. W., Freidel, D. A., Suhler, C. K., Ardren, T., Ambrosino, J. N., Shaw, J. M. & Bennett, S., 2010. Excavations at Yaxuná, Yucatán, Mexico. Oxford: Archaeopress.Google Scholar
Taube, K., 2003a. Ancient and contemporary Maya conceptions about field and forest. In The Lowland Maya Area: Three Millennium at the Human-Wildland Interface, eds. Gomez-Pompa, A., Allen, M. F., Fedick, S. L., & Jimenez-Osornio, J. J.,. New York: Food Products Press, an Imprint of the Haworth Press, Inc., 461–92.Google Scholar
Taube, K., 2003b. The maws of heaven and hell: the symbolism of the centipede and serpent in classic Maya religion. In Antropología de la Eternidad: La Muerte en la Cultura Maya, eds. Ciudad Ruiz, A., Ruz Sosa, M. H. & Iglesias Ponce de León, M. J.. Madrid: Sociedad Española de Estudios Mayas, 405–42.Google Scholar
Taube, K., 2004. Structure 10L-16 and its early classic antecedents: fire and the evocation and resurrection of K’inich Yax K’uk’ Mo’. In Understanding Early Classic Copan, eds. Bell, E. E., Canuto, M. A. & Sharer, R. J., Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 249–95.Google Scholar
Taube, K., 2005. The symbolism of jade in classic Maya religion. Ancient Mesoamerica 16, 2350.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taube, R. & Taube, K., 2009. The beautiful, the bad and the ugly: aesthetics and morality in Maya figurines. In Mesoamerican Figurines: Small-Scale Indices of Large Scale Social Phenomena, eds. Halperin, C. T., Faust, K. A., Taube, R. & Giguet, A.. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2550.Google Scholar
Taube, K. & Zender, M., 2009. American gladiators: ritual boxing in ancient Mesoamerica. In Blood and Beauty: Organized Violence in the Art and Archaeology of Mesoamerica and Central America, eds. Orr, H. & Koontz, R.. Los Angeles, CA: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press, 161220.Google Scholar
Tedlock, D., 1985. The Popol Vuh: The Mayan Book of the Dawn of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc.Google Scholar
Triadan, D., 2007. Warrior, nobles, commoners and beasts: figurines from elite buildings at Aguateca, Guatemala. Latin American Antiquity 18(3), 269–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adler, M. A., 1989. Ritual facilities and social Integration in non-ranked societies, in The Architecture of Social Integration. Occasional Paper of the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center No. 1, eds. W. D. Lipe & M. Hegmon. Cortez, CO: Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, 35–52.
Altschul, J. H. & Huber, E. K., 2000. Economics, site structure, and social organisation during the Basketmaker III period: a view from the Lukachukai Valley, in Foundations of Anasazi Culture: The Basketmaker-Pueblo Transition, ed. Reed, P. F.. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 145–60.Google Scholar
Beeman, W. O., 1993. The anthropology of theater and spectacle. Annual Review of Anthropology 22, 369–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bell, C., 1997. Ritual: Perspectives and Dimensions. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bland, A., 1976. A History of Ballet and Dance. London: Barrie & Jenkins.Google Scholar
Bradley, R., 2012. The Idea of Order: The Circular Archetype in Prehistoric Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cass, J., 1993. Dancing Through History. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (NJ): Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Cummings, B., 1953. The First Inhabitants of Arizona and the Southwest. Tucson, AZ: Cummings Publication Council.Google Scholar
Daniels, H. S., 1954. Pictographs. Appendix A, in Basketmaker II Sites near Durango, Colorado, eds. Morris, E. H. & Burgh, R. F.. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution of Washington, 87102.Google Scholar
Durkheim, E., 1912. The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y., 1998. Dancing and the beginning of art scenes in the early village communities of the Near East and Southeast Europe. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 8 (2), 207–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y., 2003. Dancing at the Dawn of Agriculture. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Gilpin, D. & Benallie, L. Jr., 2000. Juniper Cove and early Anasazi community structure west of the Chuska Mountains, in Foundations of Anasazi Culture: The Basketmaker-Pueblo Transition, ed. Reed, P. F.. Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 161–74.Google Scholar
Grant, C., 1978. Canyon de Chelly: The People and the Rock Art. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
Grimes, R. L., 1976. Symbol and Conquest: Public Ritual and Drama in Santa Fe. New York: Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Hanna, J. L., 1979. Toward a cross-cultural conceptualisation of dance and some correlate considerations, in The Performing Arts: Music and Dance, eds. Blacking, A. R. & Kealinohomoku, J. W.. The Hague: Mouton Publishers, 1745.Google Scholar
Hanna, J. L., 1987. Dance: dance and religion, in The Encyclopedia of Religion. 2nd edition, ed. Eliade, M.. New York: Macmillan Co, 436–46.Google Scholar
Hays, K. A., 1988. Human Figures in Anasazi Ceramic Vessels: Basketmaker III to Pueblo IV. Submitted as a term paper for Anthropology 426. Manuscript on file at the Arizona State Museum, Tucson.
Hieb, L. A., 1972. Meaning and mismeaning: toward an understanding of the ritual clown, in New Perspectives on the Pueblos, ed. Ortiz, A.. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 163–96.Google Scholar
Inomata, T., 2006. Plazas, performers, and spectators: political theaters of the Classic Maya. Current Anthropology 47, 805–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Inomata, T. & Coben, L. S. (eds.), 2006. Archaeology of Performance: Theaters of Power, Community, and Politics. Lanham, NY: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
Kidder, A. V., 1927. An Introduction to the Study of Southwestern Archaeology. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Kraus, R., 1969. History of Dance in Art and Education. Englewood Cliffs, NY: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Kurath, G. P., 1967. Drama, dance and music, in Social Anthropology (Handbook of Middle American Indians), ed. Nash, M.. Austin: University of Texas Press, vol. 6, 158–90.Google Scholar
Kurath, G. P. & Garcia, A., 1973. Music and Dance of the Tewa Pueblos. Santa Fe: University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
Kus, S. M., 1983. The social representation of space: dimensioning the cosmological and the quotidian, in Archaeological Hammers and Theories, eds. Moore, J. A. & Keene, A. S.. New York: Academic Press, 277–98.Google Scholar
Lange, R., 1976. The Nature of Dance. An Anthropological Perspective. New York: International Publications Service.Google Scholar
Longstreet, S., 1968. The Dance in Art. Alhambra, CA: Borden Publishing Company.Google Scholar
Marcus, J., 2007. Rethinking ritual, in The Archaeology of Ritual, ed. Kyriakidis, E.. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, 4376.Google Scholar
McNeill, W. H., 1995. Keeping Together in Time: Dance and Drill in Human History. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Morris, C. & Peatfield, A., 2002. Feeling through the body, in Thinking Through the Body: Archaeologies of Corporeality, eds. Hamilakis, Y., Pluciennik, M. & Tarlow, S.. London: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 105–20.Google Scholar
Morris, E. A., 1959. Basketmaker caves in the Prayer Rock District, Northeastern Arizona. PhD Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson.
Morris, E. A., 1980. Basketmaker Caves in the Prayer Rock District, Northeastern Arizona. Anthropological Papers of the University of Arizona 35. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
Parsons, E. C., [1939] 1996. Puebloan Indian Religion. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.Google Scholar
Pearson, M. & Shanks, M., 2001. Theater/Archaeology. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Powell, S., Cole, S. J., Hath, S. K. & Brown, S., 1998. Basketmaker Images at Falls Creek Shelters, Southwestern Colorado. Denver: Colorado Historical Society State Historical Foundation.Google Scholar
Rappaport, R. A., 1999. Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Renfrew, C., 2007. The archaeology of ritual, of cult, and of religion, in The Archaeology of Ritual, ed. Kyriakidis, E.. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California, 109–22.Google Scholar
Roberts, F. H. H., Jr., 1929. Shabik’eshchee Village: A Late Basketmaker Site in the Chaco Canyon. (Bulletin 92. Bureau of American Ethnology). Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.Google Scholar
Roediger, V. M., 1961. Ceremonial Costumes of the Pueblo Indians: Their Evolution, Fabrication, and Significance in the Prayer Drama. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Royce, A. P., 1977. The Anthropology of Dance. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Sachs, C., 1952. World History of the Dance. London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd.Google Scholar
Schaafsma, P., 1980. Indian Rock Art in the Southwest. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
Schechner, R., 1987. Drama – performance and ritual, in Encyclopaedia of Religion Vol. 4, ed. Eliade, M.. New York: MacMillan, 436–49.Google Scholar
Schechner, R., 1994. Ritual and performance, in Companion Encyclopaedia of Anthropology: Humanity, Culture and Social Life, ed. Ingold, T.. London: Routledge, 613–47.Google Scholar
Slifer, D., 2007. Kokopelli: The Magic, Mirth and Mischief of an Ancient Symbol. Salt Lake City, UT: Gibbs Smith.Google Scholar
Soar, K., 2010. Circular dance performances in the prehistoric Aegean, in Ritual Dynamics and the Science of Ritual Vol. 2, Body, Performance, Agency and Experience, ed. Michaels, A.. Wiesbaden, Germany: Harrassowitz, 137–56.Google Scholar
Spicer, R. B., 1939. The Easter Fiesta of the Yaqui Indians of Pascua, Arizona. MA thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago.
Stephens, A. M., 1936. Hopi Journal of Alexander M. Stephen. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Sweet, J. D., 1985. Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians: Expression of New Life. Santa Fe, NM: School of American Research Press.Google Scholar
Tedlock, B. 1992. The Beautiful and the Dangerous: Encounters with the Zuni Indians. New York: Viking.Google Scholar
Tuan, Y., 1997. Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience. Minneapolis: University of Minneapolis Press.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W., 1969. The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure. Chicago, IL: Aldine.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W., 1982. Celebration: Studies in Festivity and Ritual. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institute Press.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W., 1990. Are there universals of performance in myth, ritual and drama?, in By Means of Performance. Intercultural Studies of Theatre and Ritual, eds. Schechner, R. & Appel, W.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 818.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waters, F., [1963] 1977. Book of the Hopi. London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
Windes, T. C., (n.d.a.) Early Pueblo Occupations in the Chaco Region: Excavations and Survey of Basketmaker III and Pueblo I sites, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, in prep. Vol. 1. Reports of the Chaco Center No. 14. Santa Fe, NM: Division of Cultural Research, National Park Service.
Aiello, L. & Dunbar, R. I. M., 1993. Neocortex size, group size and the evolution of language. Current Anthropology, 36, 184–93.Google Scholar
Assmann, J., 1995. Collective memory and cultural identity. New German Critique, 65, 125–33.Google Scholar
Atran, S. & Henrich, J., 2010. The evolution of religion: how cognitive by-products, adaptive learning heuristics, ritual displays, and group competition generate deep commitments to prosocial religions. Biology Theory, 5(1), 1830.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Banning, E. B., 2011. So fair a house: Göbekli Tepe and the identification of temples in the pre-pottery Neolithic of the Near East. Current Anthropology, 52(5), 619–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Belfer-Cohen, A. & Goring-Morris, A. N., 2013. Breaking the mould: phases and facies in the Natufian of the Mediterranean Zone, in Natufian Foragers in the Levant: Terminal Pleistocene Social Changes in Western Asia, eds. Bar-Yosef, O. & Valla Ann Arbor, F. R., Michigan: International Monographs in Prehistory, 542–61.Google Scholar
Boyer, P., 2009. What are memories for? Functions of recall in cognition and culture, in Memory in Mind and Culture, eds. Boyer, P. & Wertsch, J. W. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 328.
Bulbulia, J. & Frean, M., 2010. The evolution of charismatic cultures. Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, 22(4), 254–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bulbulia, J. & Sosis, R., 2011. Signalling theory and the evolution of religious cooperation. Religion, 41(3), 363–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cauvin, J., 1994. Naissance des divinités, naissance de l’agriculture: la révolution des symboles au Néolithique. Paris: CNRS editions.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cauvin, J., 2000. The Birth of the Gods and the Origins of Agriculture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Cohen, A. P., 1985. The Symbolic Construction of Community. Chichester & London: Ellis Horwood, and Tavistock.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Connerton, P., 1989. How Societies Remember. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corballis, M. C., 2011. The Recursive Mind: The Origins of Human Language, Thought, and Civilization. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Cutting, M., 2005. The architecture of Çatalhöyük: continuity, household and settlement, in Çatalhöyük Perspectives: Reports from the 1995–99 Seasons, ed. Hodder, I. London; Cambridge: British Institute at Ankara; McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 151–70.Google Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M., 1998. The social brain hypothesis. Evolutionary Anthropology, 6(3), 178–90.3.0.CO;2-8>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M., 2003. The social brain: mind, language, and society in evolutionary perspective. Annual Review of Anthropology, 32, 163–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M., 2004. The Human Story: A New History of Mankind’s Evolution. London: Faber.Google Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M., 2009. The social brain hypothesis and its implications for social evolution. Annals of Human Biology, 36(5), 562–72.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dunbar, R. I. M., Gamble, C. & Gowlett, J. A. J., 2010. Social Brain, Distributed Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press & British Academy.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dunbar, R. I. M., Gamble, C. & Gowlett, J. A. J., 2014. Lucy to Language: The Benchmark Papers, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Durkheim, E. 1995. The Elementary Forms of Religious Life [1912 Les formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse]. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
Edwards, P. C., 2009. The symbolic dimensions of material culture at Wadi Hammeh 27, in Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, eds. Córdoba, J., Molist, M., Pérez, C., Rubio, I. & Martínez, S. Madrid: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 507–20.Google Scholar
Finlayson, B., Mithen, S. J., Najjar, M., Smith, S., Maričević, D., Pankhurst, N. & Yeomans, L., 2011. Architecture, sedentism, and social complexity at pre-pottery Neolithic A WF16, southern Jordan. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(20), 8183–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Flannery, K. V., 1969. The origins and ecological effects of early domestication in Iran and the Near East, in The Domestication and Exploitation of Plants and Animals, eds. Ucko, P. J. & Dimbleby, G. W.. London: Duckworth, 73100.Google Scholar
Flannery, K. V. & Marcus, J., 2012. The Creation of Inequality: How Our Prehistoric Ancestors Set the Stage for Monarchy, Slavery, and Empire. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gamble, C., 1998. Palaeolithic society and the release from proximity: a network approach to intimate relations. World Archaeology, 29(3), 426–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gamble, C., 1999. The Palaeolithic Societies of Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Gamble, C., Gowlett, J. & Dunbar, R., 2014. Thinking Big: How the Evolution of Social Life Shaped the Human Mind, London: Thames & Hudson.
Hardy-Smith, T. & Edwards, P. C., 2004. The garbage crisis in prehistory: artefact discard patterns at the early Natufian site of Wadi Harnmeh 27 and the origins of household refuse disposal strategies. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 23(3), 253–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henrich, J., 2004. Demography and cultural evolution: how adaptive cultural processes can produce maladaptive losses – the Tasmanian case. American Antiquity, 69(2), 197214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Henrich, J., 2009. The evolution of costly displays, cooperation and religion: credibility enhancing displays and their implications for cultural evolution. Evolution and Human Behavior, 30(4), 244–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodder, I., 1990. The Domestication of Europe: Structure and Contingency in Neolithic Societies. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
Hodder, I., 2005. Socialization and feasting at Catalhoyuk: a response to Adams. American Antiquity, 70(1), 189–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodder, I. & Cessford, C., 2004. Daily practice and social memory at Catalhoyuk. American Antiquity, 69(1), 1740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hodder, I. & Pels, P., 2010. History houses: a new interpretation of architectural elaboration at Çatalhöyük, in Religion in the Emergence of Civilization: Çatalhöyük as a Case Study, ed. Hodder, I.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 163–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kendal, J., 2011. Cultural niche construction and human learning environments: investigating sociocultural perspectives. Biological Theory, 6(3), 241–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kuhn, S. & Stiner, M., 2007. Body ornamentation as information technology: towards an understanding of the significance of early beads, in Rethinking the Human Revolution: New Behavioural and Biological Perspectives on the Origin and Dispersal of Modern Humans, eds. Mellars, P., Boyle, K. V., Bar-Yosef, O. & Stringer, C. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 4554.Google Scholar
Laland, K. & O’Brien, M., 2011. Cultural niche construction: an introduction. Biological Theory, 6(3), 191202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laland, K. N., Odling-Smee, J. & Feldman, M. W., 2000. Niche construction, biological evolution, and cultural change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 23(1), 131–75.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laland, K. N., Odling-Smee, J. & Feldman, M. W., 2001. Cultural niche construction and human evolution. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 14(1), 2233.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marcus, J. & Flannery, K. V., 2004. The coevolution of ritual and society: new 14C dates from ancient Mexico. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 101(52), 18257–61.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Matthews, W., 2005. Life-cycle and life-course of buildings, in Çatalhöyük Perspectives: Reports from the 1995–99 Seasons, ed. Hodder, I.. London; Cambridge: British Institute at Ankara; McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, 125–50.Google Scholar
McCauley, R. N. & Lawson, E. T., 2002. Bringing Ritual to Mind: Psychological Foundations of Cultural Forms. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mithen, S., Finlayson, B., Smith, S., Jenkins, E., Najjar, M. & Maričević, D., 2011. An 11,600 year-old communal structure from the Neolithic of southern Jordan. Antiquity, 85(328), 350–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morenz, L. D. & Schmidt, K., 2009. Grosse Releifpfeiler und kleine Zeichentäfelchen, in Non-textual Marking Systems, Writing and Pseudo Script from Prehistory to Present Times, eds. Andrássy, P., Budka, J. & Kammerzell, F. Göttingen: Lingua Aegyptia – Studia Monographica, 1331.Google Scholar
O’Brien, M. J. & Laland, K. N., 2012. Genes, culture, and agriculture: an example of human niche construction. Current Anthropology, 53(4), 434–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Odling-Smee, F. J. & Laland, K. N., 2009. Cultural niche construction: evolution’s cradle of language, in The Prehistory of Language, eds. Botha, R. & Knight, C. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 99121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Odling-Smee, J. & Laland, K., 2011. Ecological inheritance and cultural inheritance: what are they and how do they differ? Biological Theory, 6(3), 220–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Özdoğan, A., 1999. Çayönü in Neolithic in Turkey. The Cradle of Civilization, New Discoveries, eds. Özdoğan, M. & Başgelen, N. Istanbul: Arkeoloji ve Sanat Yayınları, 3563.Google Scholar
Powell, A., Shennan, S. & Thomas, M. G., 2009. Late Pleistocene demography and the appearance of modern human behavior. Science, 324(5932), 1298–301.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rendell, L., Fogarty, L. & Laland, K. N., 2011. Runaway cultural niche construction. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 366(1566), 823–35.Google Scholar
Schirmer, W., 1990. Some aspects of the building in the ‘aceramic Neolithic’ settlement at Çayönü Tepesi. World Archaeology, 21(3), 363–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, K., 2000. Göbekli Tepe, southeastern Turkey. A preliminary report on the 1995–1999 excavations. Paléorient, 26(1), 4554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, K., 2006. Sie bauten die ersten Tempel. Das rätselhafte Heiligtum der Steinzeitjäger, Munich: Beck.Google Scholar
Schmidt, K., 2011. Göbekli Tepe, in The Neolithic in Turkey. New Excavations and New Research – The Euphrates Basin, eds. Özdoğan, M., Bașgelen, N. & Kuniholm, P. Istanbul: Arkeoloji ve Sanat Yayinlari, 4183.Google Scholar
Schmidt, K., 2012. Göbekli Tepe. A Stone Age Sanctuary in South-Eastern Anatolia, Berlin: ex oriente & ArchaeNova e.V.Google Scholar
Shennan, S., 2000. Population, culture history, and the dynamics of culture change. Current Anthropology, 41(5), 811–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shennan, S., 2001. Demography and cultural innovation: a model and its implications for the emergence of modern human culture. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 11(1), 516.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sterelny, K., 2007. Social intelligence, human intelligence and niche construction. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 362(1480), 719–30.Google Scholar
Sterelny, K., 2011. The Evolved Apprentice: How Evolution Made Humans Unique. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Sterelny, K. & Watkins, T., 2015. Neolithization in southwest Asia in a context of niche construction theory. Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 25(3), 673–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stiner, M. C., 2001. Thirty years on the ‘Broad Spectrum Revolution’ and Paleolithic demography. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 98(13), 6993–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stordeur, D., 2015. Le village de Jerf el Ahmar (Syrie, 9500–8700 av. J.-C.): L’architecture, miroir d’une société néolithique complexe, Paris: CNRS Éditions.Google Scholar
Stordeur, D., Brenet, M., Der Aprahamian, G. & Roux, J.-C., 2000. Les bâtiments communautaires de Jerf el Ahmar et Mureybet, horizon PPNA (Syrie). Paléorient, 26(1), 2944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Valla, F., 1988. Aspects du sol de l’abri 131 de Mallaha (Eynan), Israel. Paléorient, 14(2), 283–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Valla, F., 2008. L’homme et l’habitat: l’invention de la maison durant la Préhistoire, Paris: CNRS Editions.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watkins, T., 1990. The origins of house and home? World Archaeology, 21(3), 336–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watkins, T., 2004a. Architecture and ‘theatres of memory’ in the Neolithic South West Asia, in Rethinking Materiality: The Engagement of Mind with the Material World, eds. DeMarrais, E., Gosden, C. & Renfrew, C. Cambridge: McDonald Institute of Archaeological Research, 97106.Google Scholar
Watkins, T., 2004b. Building houses, framing concepts, constructing worlds. Paléorient, 30(1), 524.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watkins, T., 2006. Architecture and the symbolic construction of new worlds, in Domesticating Space: Construction, Community, and Cosmology in the Late Prehistoric Near East, eds. Banning, E. B. & Chazan, M. Berlin: ex oriente, 1524.Google Scholar
Watkins, T., 2008. Supra-regional networks in the Neolithic of Southwest Asia. Journal of World Prehistory, 21(1), 139–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watkins, T., 2009. Ordering time and space: creating a cultural world, in Proceedings of the 5th International Congress on the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East, eds. Córdoba, J., Molist, M., Pérez, C., Rubio, I. & Martínez, S. Madrid: Univer-sidad Autónoma de Madrid, 647–59.Google Scholar
Watkins, T., 2010a. Changing people, changing environments: how hunter-gatherers became communities that changed the world, in Landscapes in Transition: Understanding Hunter-Gatherer and Farming Landscapes in the Early Holocene of Europe and the Levant, eds. Finlayson, B. & Warren, G. London: Levant Supplementary Series & CBRL, 104–12.Google Scholar
Watkins, T., 2010b. New light on Neolithic revolution in South-West Asia. Antiquity, 84(325), 621–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Watkins, T., 2012. Household, community and social landscape: building and maintaining social memory in the early Neolithic of southwest Asia, in ‘As Time Goes By’ Monuments, Landscapes and the Temporal Perspective. Socio-Environmental Dynamics over the Last 12,000 Years, eds. Furholt, M., Hinz, M. & Mischka Kiel, D.: Bonn: Rudolf Habelt, 2344.Google Scholar
Watkins, T., 2015. The cultural dimension of cognition. Quaternary International, 405(Part A), 91–7.
Watkins, T., Dobney, K. & Nesbitt, R. M., 1995. Qermez Dere, Tel Afar; Interim Report No. 3, Edinburgh: Department of Archaeology, University of Edinburgh.Google Scholar
Whitehouse, H., 2004. Modes of Religiosity: A Cognitive Theory of Religious Transmission, Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
Whitehouse, H. & Hodder, I., 2010. Modes of religiosity at Çatalhöyük, in Religion in the Emergence of Civilization: Çatalhöyük as a Case Study, ed. Hodder, I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 122–45.Google Scholar
Willcox, G. & Stordeur, D., 2012. Large-scale cereal processing before domestication during the tenth millennium cal BC in northern Syria. Antiquity, 86(331), 99114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yartah, T., 2004. Tell ‘Abr 3, un village du Néolithique précéramique (PPNA) sur le Moyen-Euphrate. Première approche. Paléorient, 30, 141–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yartah, T., 2005. Les bâtiments communautaires de Tell ‘Abr 3 (PPNA, Syrie). Neolithics: A Newsletter of Southwest Asia Neolithic Research, 1/05, 39.Google Scholar
Zeder, M. A., 2012. The Broad Spectrum Revolution at 40: resource diversity, intensification, and an alternative to optimal foraging explanations. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 31(3), 241–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zeder, M. A., 2016. Domestication as a model system for niche construction theory. Evolutionary Ecology, 30(2), 325–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Adams, N. 1999. Unprecedented discoveries at Hierakonpolis. Egyptian Archaeology 15: 2931.Google Scholar
Adler, A. 1982. La mort est le masque du roi. La royauté sacrée des Moundang du Tchad. Paris: Payot.Google Scholar
Alizadeh, A. 1988. Socio-economic complexity in southwestern Iran during the fifth and fourth millennia B.C.: the evidence from Tall-i Bakun A. Iran 26: 1734.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Alizadeh, A. 2008. Chogha Mish II. Final Report on the Last Six Seasons of Excavations, 1972–1978. Oriental Institute Publications 130. Chicago: The Oriental Institute.Google Scholar
Amiet, P. 1961. La glyptique mésopotamienne archaïque. Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.Google Scholar
Amiet, P. 1980. Art of the Ancient Near East. New York: Abrams.Google Scholar
Arensburg, B. & Hershkovitz, I. 1988. Nahal Hemar Cave, Neolithic human remains. ‘Atiqot 18: 50–8.Google Scholar
Balandier, G. & Maquet, J. 1974. Dictionary of Black African Civilization. New York: Leon Amiel.Google Scholar
Barkay, G. & Noy, T. 1987. On R. Gophna et al.: A forgotten mask from Er-Ram in the land of Benjamin. Qadmoniot 77–8: 57 (Hebrew).Google Scholar
Barnett, R. D. 1966. Homme masqué ou dieu-ibex? Syria 43: 259–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bar-Yosef, O. 1985. A Cave in the Desert: Nahal Hemar (Catalogue No. 258). Jerusalem: Israel Museum.Google Scholar
Bar-Yosef, O. 2003. Early Neolithic stone masks. In Őzdoğan, M., Hauptmann, H. & Başgellen, N. (eds.) From Village to Cities. Early Villages in the Near East. Studies Presented to Ufuk Esin, pp. 7386. Istanbul: Arkeoloji ve Sanat Yayinlari.Google Scholar
Bar-Yosef, O. & Alon, D. 1988. Nahal Hemar Cave. ‘Atiqot 18 (English series). Jerusalem: Israel Department of Antiquities and Museums.Google Scholar
Bédouin, T.-L. 1961. Les masques. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.Google Scholar
Beeman, W. O. 1993. The anthropology of theater and spectacle. Annual Review of Anthropology 22: 369–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Betts, A. V. G. 1987. The hunter’s perspective: 7th millennium BC rock carvings from eastern Jordan. World Archaeology 19: 214–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Betts, A. V. G. et al. 1998. The Harra and the Hamad. Excavations and Explorations in Eastern Jordan. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press.Google Scholar
Bienert, H. D. 1990. The Er-Ram mask at the Palestine Exploration Fund, London. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 9: 257–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bienkowski, P. 1991. Treasures from an Ancient Land. The Art of Jordan. Merseyside: Alan Sutton Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Biesele, E. M. 1978. Religion and folklore. In Tobias, P. V. (ed.). The Bushmen. San Hunters and Herders of Southern Africa, pp. 162–72. Cape Town and Pretoria: Human and Rousseau.Google Scholar
Birch, M. C. 1974. Pheromones. Frontiers of Biology, Vol. 32. Amsterdam and London: North-Holland Publishing Company.Google Scholar
Birket-Smith, K. 1953. The Chugach Eskimo. Copenhagen: National Museum.Google Scholar
Blacking, J. 1976. Dance, conceptual thought and production in the archaeological record. In Sieveking, G. de G., Longworth, I. H. & Wilson, K. E. (eds.) Problems in Economic and Social Archaeology, pp. 313. London: Duckworth.Google Scholar
Bloch, M. 1989. Ritual, History and Power. Monographs on Social Anthropology 58. London: London School of Economics.Google Scholar
Boaz, F. 1890. The Use of Masks and Head-Ornaments on the North-West Coast of America. Leiden: S.N.Google Scholar
Bourguignon, E. (ed.) 1973. Religion, Altered States of Consciousness, and Social Change. Columbus: Ohio State University Press.Google Scholar
Bowie, F. 2000. The Anthropology of Religion. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Brockett, O. G. 1969. The Theater: An Introduction. New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
Brockett, O. G. 1991. History of the Theatre. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar
Campbell, S. 1999. Domuztepe 1999. Anatolian Archaeology (Research Reports of the British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara) 5: 23.Google Scholar
Carter, E. 2012. On human and animal sacrifice in the Late Neolithic at Domuztepe. In Porter, A. M. & Schwartz, G. M. (eds.) Sacred Killing. The Archaeology of Sacrifice in the Ancient Near East, pp. 97124. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
Chaplin, T. 1890. A stone mask from Er-Ram. Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly 23: 268–9.Google Scholar
Cintas, P. 1946. Amulettes puniques. Tunis: Institut des Hautes Etudes de Tunis.Google Scholar
Clark, J. G. D. 1954. Excavations at Star Carr. An Early Mesolithic Site at Seamer near Scarborough, Yorkshire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Cohen, S. J. (ed.) 1998. International Encyclopedia of Dance. 6 vols. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Contenau, G. & Ghirshman, R. 1935. Fouilles du Tepe Giyan. Paris: Librairie Orientaliste Paul Geuthner.Google Scholar
Coppet, D. de. (ed.) 1992. Understanding Rituals. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Culican, W. 1975. Some Phoenician masks and other terracottas. Berytus 24: 4787.Google Scholar
Curtis, J. 1995. Gold face-masks in the ancient Near East. In Campbell, S. & Green, A. (eds.) The Archaeology of Death in the Ancient Near East, pp. 226–31. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
Dayagi-Mendeles, M. 2002. The Akhziv Cemeteries. The Ben-Dor Excavations, 1941–1944. IAA Reports 15. Jerusalem: Israel Antiquities Authority.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Delougaz, P. & Kantor, H. J. 1996. Chogha Mish I. The First Five Seasons of Excavations 1961–1971. Oriental Institute Publications 101. Chicago: The Oriental Institute.Google Scholar
Dollfus, J. 1983. Tepe Djowi: contrôle stratigraphique, 1975. Cahiers de la Délégation Archéologique Française en Iran 13: 17131.Google Scholar
Durkheim, E. 1912. The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
Emigh, J. 1996. Masked Performance. The Play of Self and Other in Ritual and Theatre. Philadelphia: University of Philadelphia Press.Google Scholar
Emmons, G. T. 1991. The Tlingit Indians. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
Evans-Pritchard, E. E. 1928. The dance. Africa 1: 446–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans-Pritchard, E. E. 1937. Witchcraft, Oracles and Magic among the Azande. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Flannery, K. V. 1972. The cultural evolution of civilizations. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 3: 399426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fraioli, F,. Moretti, C., Paolucci, D., Alicicco, E., Crescenzi, F. & Fortunio, G. 1980. Physical exercise stimulates marked concomitant release of β-endorphin and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) in peripheral blood in man. Experientia 36: 987–9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frankfort, H. 1934. A Tammuz ritual in Kurdistan. Iraq 1: 137–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frazer, J. G. 1911. The Golden Bough: A Study in Comparative Religion. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Frisch, K. von 1967. The Dance Language and Orientation of Bees. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University.Google Scholar
Fukai, S., Horiuchi, K. & Matsutani, T. 1974. Telul eth Thalathat, Vol. III. The Excavation of Tell V. The Tokyo University Iraq-Iran Archaeological Expedition Report 15. Tokyo: The Institute of Oriental Culture.Google Scholar
Garfield, V. E. & Wingert, P. S. 1966. The Tsimshian Indians and Their Arts. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 1994. Ritual burial of cultic objects, the earliest evidence. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 4: 159–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 1998. Dancing and the beginning of art scenes in the early village communities of the Near East and Southeast Europe. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 8/2: 207–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 1999. Neolithic and Chalcolithic Pottery of the Southern Levant. Qedem 39. Jerusalem: Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 2000. The Khazineh painted style of western Iran. Iran 37: 5769.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 2003. Dance at the Dawn of Agriculture. Austin: Texas University Press.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 2005. Dancing diamonds. Iran 43: 117–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y. 2010. Dance in prehistoric Europe. Documenta Praehistorica 37: 205–14.Google Scholar
Gautier, J. E. & Lampre, G. 1905. Fouilles de Moussian. Mémoires de la Délégation Archéologique en Perse 8: 59148.Google Scholar
Gerbrands, A. A. 1978. Talania and Nake, master carver and apprentice: two woodcarvers from the Kilenge (western New Britain). In Greenhalgh, M. & Megaw, V. (eds.) Art in Society. Studies in Style, Culture and Aesthetics, pp. 193205. London: Duckworth.Google Scholar
Gilead, I. 2002. Religio-magic behavior in the Chalcolithic period of Palestine. In Oren, E. D. & Ahituv, S. (eds.) Studies in Archaeology and Related Disciplines. Aharon Kempinski Memorial Volume, pp. 103–28. Beersheva: Ben-Gurion University.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. A. 1982. The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe 6500–3500 B.C., Myths and Cult Images. Berkeley: University of California.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. A. 1989. The Language of the Goddess. London: Thames and Hudson.Google Scholar
Glazier, S. D. (ed.) 1997. Anthropology of Religion: A Handbook. Westport/London: Praeger.Google Scholar
Glotz, S. (ed.) 1975. Le masque dans la tradition européenne. Binche: Musée international du carnaval et de masque.Google Scholar
Gophna, R., Lev-Yadon, S. & Lifschitz, N. 1986. A forgotten mask from Er-Ram in the land of Benjamin. Qadmoniot 75–6: 82–3 (Hebrew).Google Scholar
Gregor, J. 1937. Masks of the World. An Historical and Pictorial Survey of Many Types and Times (republished 1968). New York: Benjamin Blom Inc.Google Scholar
Grimes, R. L. 1985. Research in Ritual Studies: A Programmatic Essay and Bibliography. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press.Google Scholar
Gruber, N. I. 1981. Ten dance-derived expressions in the Hebrew Bible. Biblica 62: 328–46.Google Scholar
Guiart, J. 1966. Mythologie du masque en nouvelle-Calédonie. Publications de la Société des Océanistes No. 18. Paris: Musée de l’Homme.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hahner-Herzog, I., Kecskési, M., Vajda, L. & Gabriel, J. W. 1998. African Masks from the Barbier-Mueller Collection, Geneva. Munich: Prestel.Google Scholar
Hanna, J. L. 1979. Toward a cross-cultural conceptualization of dance and some correlate considerations. In Blacking, J. & Kealinohomoku, J. W. (eds.) The Performing Arts. Music and Dance, pp. 1745. The Hague: Mouton Publishers.Google Scholar
Hanna, J. L. 1987. Dance and religion. In Eliade, M. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 4:203–12. New York: MacMillan.Google Scholar
Harley, G. W. 1950. Masks as Agents of Social Control in Northeast Liberia. Cambridge: Peabody Museum, Harvard University.Google Scholar
Hartmann, G. 1967. Masken südamerikanischer Naturvölker. Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde.Google Scholar
Hauptmann, H. 1993. Ein Kultgebäude in Nevali Çori. In Frangipane, M., Hauptmann, H., Liverani, M., Matthiae, P. & Mellink, M. (eds.) Between the Rivers and Over the Mountains, pp. 3769. Rome: Universita di Roma.Google Scholar
Hauptmann, H. 1999. The Urfa region. In Ozdogan, M. & Basgelen, N. (eds.) Neolithic in Turkey, pp. 6586. Istanbul: Arkeoloji ve Sanat Yayinlari.Google Scholar
Hermansen, B. D. 1997. Art and ritual behaviour in Neolithic Basta. In Gebel, H. G. K. & Rollefson, G. O. (eds.) The Prehistory of Jordan, II. Perspectives from 1997, pp. 333–43. Studies in Early Near Eastern Production, Subsistence, and Environment 4. Berlin: ex oriente.Google Scholar
Herzfeld, E. 1932. Iranische Denkmäler. Berlin: Dietrich Reimer and Ernst Vohsen.Google Scholar
Herzfeld, E. 1941. Iran in the Ancient East. London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Holas, B. 1952. Les masques Kono (haute-Guinée Française). Leur rôle dans la vie religieuse et politique. Paris: Librairie Orientaliste Paul Geuthner.Google Scholar
Hole, F., Flannery, K. V. & Neely, J. A. 1969. Prehistory and Human Ecology of the Deh Luran Plain. An Early Village Sequence from Khuzistan, Iran. Memoirs of the Museum of Anthropology, No. 1. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.Google Scholar
Höpfner, G. 1969. Masken aus Ceylon. Berlin: Museum für Völkerkunde.Google Scholar
Kaeppler, A. L. 1992. Dance. In Bauman, R. (ed.) Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments, pp. 196203. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kaplan, J. 1969. ‘Ein El-Jarba. Chalcolithic remains in the Plain of Esdraelon. Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 194: 239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Karageorghis, V. 1971. Notes on some Cypriote priests wearing bull-masks. Harvard Theological Review 64: 261–70.Google Scholar
Karlson, P. & Lüscher, M. 1959. Pheromones: a new term for a class of biologically active substances. Nature 183: 55–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Katz, R. 1982. Boiling Energy. Community Healing among the Kalahari Kung. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Kyriakidis, E., ed. 2007. The Archaeology of Ritual. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology UCLA Publications.Google Scholar
Lange, R. 1976. The Nature of Dance. An Anthropological Perspective. New York: International Publications Service.Google Scholar
Langsdorff, A. & McCown, D. E. 1942. Tall-I-Bakun A, Season of 1932. The University of Chicago, Oriental Institute Publications 59. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Le Breton, L. 1947. Note sur la céramique peinte aux environs de Suse et à Suse. Mémoires de la Mission Archéologique en Iran 30:120219. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.Google Scholar
Leroi-Gourhan, A. 1967. Treasures of Prehistoric Art. New York: H. N. Abrams.Google Scholar
Lévi-Strauss, C. 1962. The Savage Mind (republished in 1976). London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.Google Scholar
Lévi-Strauss, C. 1975. The Way of the Masks. Seattle: University of Washington Press (English edition 1982).Google Scholar
Lommel, A. 1972. Masks: Their Meaning and Function. London: Paul Elek Books.Google Scholar
Louis, M. 1955. Les origines préhistoriques de la danse. Cahiers Ligures de Préhistoire et d’Archéology 4: 337.Google Scholar
Lucas, H. 1973. Java Maskem. Der Tanz auf einem Bein. Kassel: Erich Röth-Verlag.Google Scholar
Mack, J. 1994. Masks. The Art of Expression. London: British Museum Press.Google Scholar
Malinowski, B. 1948. Magic, Science and Religion and Other Essays. London: Souvenir Press.Google Scholar
Mallon, A., Koeppel, R. & Neuvill, R. 1934. Teleilat Ghassul I: Compte rendu des fouilles de l’Institut Biblique Pontifical 1929–1932. Rome: Pontifical Biblical Institute.Google Scholar
Mamczarz, I. 1999. Le masque et l’âme: de l’improvisation á la création theâtrale. Paris: Klincksieck.Google Scholar
Marcus, J. & Flannery, K. V. 1994. Ancient Zapotec ritual and religion: an application of the direct historical approach. In Renfrew, C. & Zubrow, E. B. W. (eds.) The Ancient Mind. Elements of Cognitive Archaeology, pp. 5574. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marshall, L. 1969. The medicine dance of the !Kung bushmen. Africa 39: 347–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mazar, A. 1980. Excavations at Tell Qasile Vol. 1. The Philistine Sanctuary: Architecture and Cult Objects. Qedem 12. Jerusalem: Institute of Archaeology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar
McNeill, W. H. 1995. Keeping Together in Time. Dance and Drill in Human History. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Mellaart, J. 1970. Excavations at Hacilar. Edinburgh: The British Institute of Archaeology at Ankara.Google Scholar
Meyerhof, E. & Mozel, I. 1981. A new interpretation of the applied figurines on the jar from Ein el-Jarba, near Tell Abu Zureiq, Israel. Bollettino del Centro Camuno di Studi Preistorici 8: 114–16.Google Scholar
Mithen, S. 1996. The Prehistory of the Mind: A Search for the Origins of Art, Religion and Science. London: Thames & Hudson.Google Scholar
Morley, I. 2013. The Prehistory of Music: Human Evolution, Archaeology, and the Origins of Musicality. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Morris, B. 1987. Anthropological Studies of Religion: An Introductory Text. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Napier, A. D. 1986. Masks, Transformation and Paradox. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Napier, D. 1987. Festival masks. In Falassi, A. (ed.) Time out of Time, Essays on the Festival, pp. 211–19. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico.Google Scholar
Nissen, H. J., Muheisen, M. & Gebel, H. G. 1987. Report on the first two seasons of excavations at Basta (1986–1987). Annual of the Department of Antiquities of Jordan 31: 79119, 548–54.Google Scholar
Noy, T. 1988. A radial decoration on human face images from the PPNB Period. Israel Museum Journal 7: 109–12.Google Scholar
Nys, K. 1995. The use of masks in Cyprus during the Late Bronze Age. Journal of Prehistoric Religion 9: 1934.Google Scholar
Ornan, T. 1986. A Man and His Land. Highlights from the Moshe Dayan Collection (Catalogue No. 270). Jerusalem: Israel Museum (Hebrew).Google Scholar
Osten-Sacken, E. von der 1992. Der Ziegen-‘Dämon’. Alter Orient und Altes Testament 230. Neukirchen-Vluyn: Neukirchener Verlag.Google Scholar
Ottenberg, S. 1975. Masked Rituals of Afikpo. Seattle: University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
Pernet, H. 1987. Masks, theoretical perspective and ritual in non-literate cultures. In Eliade, M. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. I, pp. 259–69. New York: MacMillan.Google Scholar
Pernet, H. 1992. Ritual Masks: Deceptions and Revelations (translated by L. Grillo). Columbia: University of South Carolina Press.Google Scholar
Perrot, J. 1979. Syria-Palestine I. Archaeologia Mundi. Geneva: Nagel.Google Scholar
Porada, E. 1965. Ancient Iran: The Art of Pre-Islamic Times. London: Methuen.Google Scholar
Radcliffe-Brown, A. 1922. The Andaman Islanders (reprinted with additions in 1948). Glencoe, IL: The Free Press.Google Scholar
Rappaport, R. A. 1971. The sacred in human evolution. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 2: 2344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rappaport, R. A. 1999. Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Renfrew, C. 1985. The Archaeology of Cult. The Sanctuary of Phylakopi. London: British School of Archaeology in Athens Supplement 9.Google Scholar
Rollefson, G. O. 1983. Ritual and ceremony at Neolithic ‘Ain Ghazal (Jordan). Paléorient 9/2: 2938.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rollefson, G. O. 1986. Neolithic ‘Ain Ghazal (Jordan): ritual and ceremony, II. Paléorient 12/1: 4552.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Royce, A. P. 1977. The Anthropology of Dance. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Sachs, C. 1952. World History of the Dance. New York: Seven Arts.Google Scholar
Schechner, R. 1987. Drama – performance and ritual. In Eliade, M. (ed.) Encyclopedia of Religion, Vol. 4:436–46. New York: MacMillan.Google Scholar
Schechner, R. 1994. Ritual and performance. In Ingold, T. (ed.) Companion Encyclopedia of Anthropology: Humanity, Culture and Social Life, pp. 613–47. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Schliemann, H. 1880. Mycenae. A Narrative of Researches and Discoveries at Mycenae and Tiryns. New York: Arno Press (new edition 1976).Google Scholar
Segy, L. 1976. Masks of Black Africa. New York: Dover Publications.Google Scholar
Sorell, W. 1973. The Other Face. The Mask in the Arts. London: Thames and Hudson.Google Scholar
Spencer, P. 1985. Introduction: interpretations of the dance in anthropology. In Spencer, P. (ed.) Society and the Dance. The Social Anthropology of Process and Performance, pp. 146. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Starcky, J. 1984. Le Musée de la Bible et Terre Sainte. Le Monde de la Bible 36: 52–4.Google Scholar
Stein, A. 1936. An archaeological tour in ancient Persia. Iraq 3: 111225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stekelis, M. 1972. The Yarmukian Culture of the Neolithic Period. Jerusalem: Magnes Press.Google Scholar
Stern, E. 1976. Phoenician masks and pendants. Palestine Exploration Quarterly 108: 109–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sweeney, D. 1993. Egyptian masks in motion. Göttinger Miszellen, Beiträge zur Ägyptologischen Diskussion 135: 101–4.Google Scholar
Taylor, J. H. 1994. Masks in ancient Egypt: the image of divinity. In Mack, J. (ed.) Masks: The Art of Expression. London: British Museum Press.Google Scholar
Theodossiv, N. 1998. The dead with golden face: Dasaretian, Pelagonian, Mygdonian and Boeotian funeral masks. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 17: 345–67.Google Scholar
Theodossiv, N. 2000. The dead with golden face II: other evidence and connections. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 19: 175210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tobler, A. J. 1950. Excavations at Tepe Gawra, Vol. II. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
Tribhuwan, R. D. & Savelli, L. 2003. Tribal Masks and Myths. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W 1969. The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure. Chicago: Aldine.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W. 1982. Celebration: Studies in Festivity and Ritual. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institute Press.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W. 1984. Liminality and the performative genres. In MacAloon, J. J. (ed.) Rite, Drama, Festival, Spectacle. Rehearsals toward a Theory of Cultural Performance, pp. 1941. Philadelphia: Institute for the Study of Human Issues.Google Scholar
Turner, V. W. 1990. Are there universals of performance in myth, ritual, and drama? In Schechner, R. & Appel, W. (eds.) By Means of Performance. Intercultural Studies of Theatre and Ritual, pp. 818. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tylor, E. B. 1871. Primitive Culture: Researches into the Development of Mythology, Philosophy, Religion, Art and Custom. London: Murray. Republished in 1958 as Religion in Primitive Culture. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
Uzunoglu, E. 1993. Women in Anatolia from prehistoric ages to the Iron Age. In Renda, G. (ed.) Woman in Anatolia. 9000 Years of the Anatolian Woman, pp. 1624. Istanbul: Turkish Republic Ministry of Culture.Google Scholar
Valentine, C. A. 1961. Masks and Men in a Melanesian Society. Lawrence: University of Kansas Publications.Google Scholar
Vanderwal, R. (ed.) 1982. The Aboriginal Photographs of Baldwin Spencer. South Yarra, Victoria: A Currey O’Neil Book.Google Scholar
Verhoeven, M. 2002. Ritual and its investigation in prehistory. In Gebel, H. G. K., Hermansen, B. D. & Jensen, C. H. (eds.) Magic Practices and Ritual in the Near Eastern Neolithic. Studies in Early Near Eastern Production, Subsistence, and Environment 8, pp. 540. Berlin: ex oriente.Google Scholar
Vincent, L. H. 1935. Les fouilles de Teleilat Ghassul. Revue Biblique 44: 69104.Google Scholar
Whitehouse, H. 1995. Inside the Cult. Religious Innovation and Transmission in Papua New Guinea. Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
Wilson, E. O. 1975. Sociobiology: The New Synthesis. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University.Google Scholar
Wolinski, A. 1986. Ancient Egyptian ceremonial masks. Discussions in Egyptology 6: 4753.Google Scholar
Yadin, Y. 1972. Hazor, the Head of all those Kingdoms. London: British Academy.Google Scholar
Yeivin, E. & Mozel, E. 1977. A fossil directeur figurine of the Pottery Neolithic A. Tel Aviv 4: 194200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yizraeli-Noy, T. 1999. The Human Figure in Prehistoric Art in the Land of Israel. Jerusalem: Israel Museum (Hebrew).Google Scholar
Young, J. & Young, S. 1955. Terracotta Figurines from Kourion in Cyprus. Philadelphia: University Museum.Google Scholar
Bohutong shu zheng 白虎通疏證. Edited by Li, Chen 陳立 (1809–69). Beijing: Zhonghua, 1997.Google Scholar
Chunqiu fanlu yi zheng 春秋繁露義證. Edited by Yu, Su 蘇輿. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1996.Google Scholar
Da Dai Liji jiegu 大戴禮記解詁. Edited by Pinzhen, Wang 王聘珍. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1998.Google Scholar
Qingyu, Du 杜庆余, 2010. Handai tianzhuang yanjiu 汉代田庄研究. Jinan: Shandong daxue.Google Scholar
Duduan 獨斷. Han Wei congshu edition.
Eno, Robert, 1990. The Confucian Creation of Heaven. Philosophy and the Defense of Ritual Mastery. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Feuchtwang, Stephan, 2010. The Anthropology of Religion, Charisma, and Ghosts: Chinese Lessons for Adequate Theory. Berlin & New York: De Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fu, Guo 郭郛 et al., 1999. Zhongguo gudai dongwu xue shi 中国古代动物学史. Beijing: Kexue chubanshe.Google Scholar
Guanzi jiaoshi 管子校釋. Edited by Changyao, Yan 顔昌嶢. Changsha: Yuelu shushe, 1996.Google Scholar
Han Feizi jishi 韓非子集釋. Edited by Qiyou, Chen 陳奇猷. Gaoxiong: Fuwen, 1991.Google Scholar
Han guan yi 漢官儀. Sibu beiyao edition.
Hanshu 漢書. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1962.
Hou Hanshu 後漢書. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1965.
Huainanzi honglie jijie 淮南子鴻烈集解. Edited by Wendian, Liu 劉文典. Taipei: Wenshizhe, 1992.Google Scholar
Kaltenmark, M., 1953. Le Lie-Sien Tchouan. Paris: Université de Paris; Publications du Centre d’Etudes Sinologiques de Pékin.Google Scholar
Keuls, Eva C., 1978. Plato and Greek Painting. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Koller, H., 1954. Die Mimesis in der Antike. Bern: A. Francke.Google Scholar
Lewis, Mark E., 1990. Sanctioned Violence in Early China. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Lewis, Mark E., 2006. The Flood Myths of Early China. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Haixia, Li 李海霞, 2002. Hanyu dongwu mingming yanjiu 漢語動物命名研究. Chengdu: Ba Shu shushe.Google Scholar
Song, Li 李凇 ed., 2001. Handai renwu diaoke yishu 漢代人物雕刻藝術. Changsha: Hunan meishu chubanshe.Google Scholar
Liji zhushu 禮記注疏. Shisanjing zhushu edition; rpt. Taizhong: Landeng, n.d., vol. 5.
Li, Liu, 1996. Mortuary ritual and social hierarchy in the Longshan culture. Early China 21, 146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lo, Vivienne ed., 2012. Perfect Bodies: Sports, Medicine and Immortality. London: British Museum Research Publications no. 188.Google Scholar
Loewe, M., 1994. Divination, Mythology and Monarchy in Han China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Lunheng jiaoshi 論衡校釋. Edited by Pansui, Liu 劉盼遂. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1990.Google Scholar
Lunyu zhushu 論語注疏. Annotated by Xing Bing 邢昺 (932–1010). Shisanjing zhushu edition, vol. 8.
Lüshi chunqiu jiaoshi 呂氏春秋校釋. Edited by Qiyou, Chen 陳奇猷. Shanghai, Xuelin, 1995.Google Scholar
Major, John S., 2008. Animals and animal metaphors in Huainanzi. Asia Major (third series), 21.1, 133–51.Google Scholar
Major, John S. et al., 2010. The Huainanzi: A Guide to the Theory and Practice of Government in Early Han China. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Mao shi zhengyi 毛詩正義. Shisanjing zhushu edition, vol. 2.
Mawangdui Han mu boshu 馬王堆漢墓帛書 (1980–5). Edited by Mawangdui Han mu boshu zhengli xiaozu. Beijing: Wenwu.
Mengzi zhushu 孟子注疏. Shisanjing zhushu edition; rpt. Taizhong: Landeng, n.d., vol. 8.
Mozi jiaozhu 墨子校注. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1993.
Needham, Joseph M., 1954–. Science and Civilisation in China. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Powers, M., 1991. Art and Political Expression in Early China. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Ptak, R., 2012. Birds and Beasts in Chinese Texts and Trade. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitch.Google Scholar
Rickett, W. Allyn, 1998. Guanzi. Political, Economic, and Philosophical Essays from Early China. Volume Two. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Shaanxi sheng kaogu yanjiusuo ed., 2001. Han Yangling 汉阳陵. Chongqing: Chongqing chubanshe.
Shangshu da zhuan 尚書大傳. Congshu jicheng edition.
Shanhaijing jiaozhu 山海經校注. Annotated by Ke, Yuan 袁珂. Shanghai: Guji, 1980.Google Scholar
Shiji 史記. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1959.
Shuowen jiezi zhu 說文解字注. Annotated by Yucai, Duan 段玉裁 (1735–1815). Taipei: Yiwen, 1965.Google Scholar
Shuoyuan jiaozheng 說苑校證. Edited by Zonglu, Xiang 向宗魯. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1987.Google Scholar
Sterckx, R., 2000. Transforming the beasts: animals and music in early China. T’oung Pao 86, 146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sterckx, R., 2002. The Animal and the Daemon in Early China. Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Sterckx, R., 2005. Animal classification in ancient China. East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine 23, 2653.Google Scholar
Sterckx, R., 2011. Food, Sacrifice, and Sagehood in Early China. New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sterckx, R., 2012. Animals, gaming and entertainment in traditional China, in Lo, Vivienne ed., Perfect Bodies: Sports, Medicine and Immortality (London: British Museum Research Publications no. 188, 2012), 31–8.Google Scholar
van Ess, H., 2003. An interpretation of the Shenwu Fu of Tomb no. 6, Yinwan. Monumenta Serica 51, 605–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wenzi 文子. Sibu beiyao edition.
Henglian, Xia 夏亨廉 et al. (1996). Handai nongye huaxiang zhuanshi 汉代农业画像砖石. Beijing: Nongye chubanshe.Google Scholar
Kengda, Xiao 萧亢达, 2010. Handai yuewu baixi yishu yanjiu 汉代乐舞百戏艺术研究. Beijing: Wenwu chubanshe.Google Scholar
Xinlun 新論. Attributed to Huan Tan 桓譚 (43 BC- AD 28). Sibu beiyao edition.
Xunzi jijie 荀子集解. Edited by Xianqian, Wang 王先謙 (1842–1918). Beijing: Zhonghua, 1997.Google Scholar
Xiangdong, Yang 杨向东, 2000a. Zhongguo gudai tiyu wenhua shi 中国古代体育文化史. Tianjin: Tianjin renmin chubanshe.Google Scholar
Yang, Xiaoneng, 2000b. Reflections of Early China: Decor, Pictographs, and Pictorial Inscriptions. Seattle and London: The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art and University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
Yantie lun jiaozhu 鹽鐵論校注. Compiled by Kuan, Huan 桓寬 (1st century BC), annotated by Wang Liqi. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1996.Google Scholar
Yanzi chunqiu jishi 晏子春秋集釋. Edited by Zeyu, Wu 吳則虞. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1962.Google Scholar
Zhangjiashan Han mu zhujian (tomb no. 247) 張家山漢墓竹簡 (二四七號墓). Beijing: Wenwu, 2001.
Zhanguo huiyao 戰國會要. Edited by Yang Kuan 楊寬 and Wu Haokun 吳浩坤. Shanghai: Shanghai guji, 2005.
Zhouli zhengyi 周禮正義. Shisanjing zhushu edition, vol.3.
Zhuangzi jishi 莊子集釋. Edited by Guo Qingfan 郭慶藩. Taipei: Guanya, 1991.
Zuozhuan: Chunqiu Zuozhuan zhu 春秋左傳注, edited by Yang Bojun 楊伯峻. Beijing: Zhonghua, 1995.
Aldhouse-Green, M. & Aldhouse-Green, S.. 2005. The Quest for the Shaman: Shape-Shifters, Sorcerers and Spirit Healers of Ancient Europe. London, Thames & Hudson.
Ashby, T., Bradley, R. N., Peet, T. E. & Tagliaferro, N.. 1913. Archaeological investigations in Malta. Papers of the British School at Rome VI, 1127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ashley, S., Bending, J., Cook, G., Corrado, A., Malone, C., Pettitt, P., Puglisi, D., Redhouse, R. & Stoddart, S.. 2007. The resources of an upland community in the fourth millennium BC. In Fitzjohn, M. (ed.), Uplands of Ancient Sicily and Calabria. The Archaeology and Landscape Revisited. Accordia Specialist Studies on Italy. University College, London. Vol 13. London, 5980.Google Scholar
Barber, G., Redhouse, D. & Stoddart, S.. 2009. The animal bone, in Malone, C. et al. (eds.), pp. 330–5.Google Scholar
Barker, G. 1985. Prehistoric Farming in Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Barker, G. 2000. Hidden prehistoric landscapes: an Italian perspective. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 13 (1), 100–2.Google Scholar
Barker, G. 2006. The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory: Why Did Foragers Become Farmers. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bonnano, A. 1990. Malta: An Archaeological Paradise. Second ed. Valletta, Malta, M. J. Publications.Google Scholar
Breuil, H. 1952. Four Hundred Centuries of Cave Art. Montignac: CEDP.Google Scholar
Burkert, W. 1979. Structure and History in Greek Mythology (section entitled ‘Shamans, Caves and the Master of Animals’). Berkeley: University of California Press. (Reprinted in Narby, J. & F. Huxley (eds.). 2001. Shaman through Time: 500 Years on the Path to Knowledge. London, Thames and Hudson, 223–6).Google Scholar
Carroll, F. A., Fenech, K., Bonanno, A, Hunt, C., Jones, A. M. & Schembri, P. J.. 2004. The past environment of the Maltese islands: the Marsa cores, in Exploring the Maltese Prehistoric Temple Culture. 2003 Conference in Malta (CD-ROM), ed. Sarasota, L. Eneix., FL: EMPTC.Google Scholar
Carroll, F. A., Hunt, C. O.. Schembri, P. J. & Bonanno, A.. 2012. Holocene climate change, vegetation history and human impact in the Central Mediterranean: evidence from the Maltese Islands. Quaternary Science Review 52 (2012) 2440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cazzella, A. & Recchia, G.. 2012. Tas-Silġ: the Late Neolithic megalithic sanctuary and its re-use. Scienze dell’Antichita 18, 1538.Google Scholar
Cilia, D. 2004. Malta before History. The World’s Oldest Freestanding Architecture. Sliema: Miranda Publishers.Google Scholar
Clark, J. G. D. 1954. Excavations at Star Carr: An Early Mesolithic Site at Seamer near Scarborough, Yorkshire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Devet, E. 2001. Rock art and the material culture of Siberian and Central Asian Shamanism. In Price, N. (ed.), The Archaeology of Shamanism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Dietler, M. 2011. Feasting and fasting. In Insoll, T. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of The Archaeology of Ritual. Oxford: Oxford University Handbook, 179–94.Google Scholar
Dietler, M. & Hayden, B., 2001. Feasts: Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspectives on Food. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Earle, T. 1997. How Chiefs Come to Power: The Political Economy in Prehistory. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Evans, A. 1901. Mycenaean tree- and pillar-cult and its Mediterranean relations. The Journal of Hellenic Studies 31 (107), 135–8.Google Scholar
Evans, J. D. 1953. The prehistoric culture sequence of the Maltese archipelago. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 19, 4194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, J. D. 1971. The Prehistoric Antiquities of the Maltese Islands. London: Athlone Press.Google Scholar
Fenech, K. 2009. Human Induced Changes in the Environment and Landscape of the Maltese Islands from the Neolithic to the 15th Century AD as Inferred from a Scientific Study of Sediments from Marsa, Malta. Oxford: BAR (Int. Series) 1682.Google Scholar
Fiorentini, G., D’Oronzo, C. & Colaianni, G.. 2012. Human-environmental interaction in Malta from the Neolithic to the Roman period: archaeobotanical analyses at Tas-Silġ. Scienze dell’Antichita 18.Google Scholar
Gamble, C. S. & Moser, S.. 1998. Ancestral Images: The Iconography of Human Origins. Cornell, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. 1982. The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe 6500–3500 BC. Myths, Cults and Images. London: Thames and Hudson.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. 1989. The Language of the Goddess. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. 1991. The Civilisation of the Goddess: The world of Old Europe. San Francisco, CA: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
Gimbutas, M. & Dexter, M. (ed.). 2001. The Living Goddess. Oakland. University of California Press.
Green, R. & Kirch, P.. 2001. Hawaiki, Ancestral Polynesia: An Essay in Historical Anthropology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Grima, R. 2007. Landscape and ritual in Late Neolithic Malta. In Barrowclough, D. & Malone, C. (eds.), Cult in Context. Reconsidering Ritual in Archaeology. Oxford: Oxbow, 3540.Google Scholar
Grima, R. 2008. Landscape, territories, and the life-histories of monuments in Temple Period Malta. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 21 (1), 3556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halstead, P. 1989. The economy has a normal surplus: economic stability and social change among early farming communities in Thessaly, Greece. In Bad Year Economics: Responses to Risk and Uncertainty. Halstead, P. & O’Shea, J. (eds.), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halstead, P. 1996. Pastoralism or household herding? Problems of scale and Specialisation in early Greek animal husbandry. World Archaeology 28 (1), 2042.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hayden, B. 2014. The Power of Feasts: From Prehistory to the Present. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hayden, B & Villeneuve, S.. n.d. Preliminary report on feasting in Futuna. www.sfu.ca/archaeology-old/dept/fac_bio/hayden/reports/futuna.pdf (accessed January 2015). www.sfu.ca/archaeology-old/dept/fac_bio/hayden/reports/futuna.pdf
Hayden, B. & Villeneuve, S., 2011. A century of feasting studies. Annual Review of Anthropology 40(1), 433–449.
Hunt, C. O. 1997. Quaternary deposits in the Maltese islands: a microcosm of environmental change in Mediterranean lands. Geojournal 41(1), 311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hunt, C. O. & Schembri, P. J., 1999. Quaternary environments and biogeography of the Maltese Islands. In Mifsud, A. & Ventura, C. Savona (eds.), Facets of Maltese prehistory, Malta: The Prehistoric Society of Malta, Mediterranean Archaeology 21/1: 35–56.Google Scholar
Insoll, T. 2011. Sacrifice. In Insoll, T. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual. Oxford: Oxford University Handbook, 15165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jarman, M. R., Bailey, G. N. & Jarman, H. N.. 1982. Early European Agriculture: Its Foundation and Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Jones, A. 2011. Biographies in Stone: Place, Memory and the Prehistory of Sculpture. In Bonnaventura, P. & Jones, A. (eds.), Sculpture and Archaeology. Farnham: Ashgate Publishing.Google Scholar
Junker, L. L. 1999. Raiding, Trading, and Feasting: The Political Economy of Philippine Chiefdoms. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
Lai, L, O’Connor, T. & Tykot, R.. 2009. Diet and environment in Maltese prehistory. In Malone et al. 2009. Chapter 11, 335–40.
Legg, A. J. & Rowley-Conwy, P. A.. 1988. Star Carr Revisited. London: Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London.Google Scholar
Magro Conti, J. & Saliba, P. C. (eds.), 2007. The Significance of Cart-Ruts in Ancient Landscapes. Malta: Midsea Books Ltd.Google Scholar
Malone, C. 2007. Ritual, space and structure – the context of cult in Malta and Gozo. In Barrowclough, D. & Malone, C. (eds.), Cult in Context. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2334Google Scholar
Malone, C. 2008. Metaphor and Maltese art: explorations in the Temple Period. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology 21 (1), 81109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malone, C., Ayala, G., Fitzjohn, M. & Stoddart, S.. 2004. Under the volcano. Accordia Research Papers. University College London, London, 9721.Google Scholar
Malone, C. & Stoddart, S.. 2012–13. Ritual failure and the temple collapse in IIIrd millennium BC Malta. In Koutrafouri, V. (ed.), Ritual Failure. Amsterdam: Sidestone Press.Google Scholar
Malone, C. & Stoddart, S. (eds). in prep. The Art of Ritual in Prehistoric Malta. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Malone, C., Stoddart, S., Trump, D., Bonanno, A., Gouder, T. & Pace, A.. (eds.) 2009. Mortuary Customs in Prehistoric Malta: Excavations at the Brochtorff-Xaghra Circle, Gozo, 1987–1994. Cambridge: McDonald Institute Monographs.Google Scholar
Nelson, S. M. 2011. Gender and religion in archaeology. In Insoll, T. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Ritual. Oxford: Oxford University Handbook, 195207.Google Scholar
Perodie, J. 2001. Feasting for prosperity: a study of southern northwest coast feasting. In Feasts: Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspectives on Food, Politics, and Power. Dietler, M. & Hayden, B. (eds.), 185214. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Renfrew, A. C. 1973 . Before Civilisation. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
Rozwadowski, A. 2001. Sun gods or shamans? Interpreting the ‘solar-headed’ praxis of Central Asia. In Price, N. (ed.), The Archaeology of Shamanism. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Sullivan, J. P. 2011. The Satyricon by Petronius (translated by J. P. Sullivan). Harmondsworth: Penguin Classics.Google Scholar
Trump, D. H. 1966. Skorba. Oxford: Society of Antiquaries of London. Monographs XXII.Google Scholar
Trump, D. 1976. The collapse of the Maltese temples. In Sieveking, G, Longworth, I. & Wilson, K. E. (eds.), Problems in Economic and Social Archaeology. London: Duckworth, 605–9.Google Scholar
Trump, D. 1983. Megalithic architecture in Malta. In Renfrew, A. C. (ed.), The Megalithic Monuments of Western Europe. London: Thames and Hudson, pp. 6476.Google Scholar
Trump, D. 2002. Malta: Prehistory and Temples. Malta: Midsea Books Ltd.Google Scholar
Ventura, F. 2004. Temple Orientations. In Cilia, D. (ed.), 307–26.Google Scholar
Vella Gregory, I. 2005. The Human Form in Neolithic Malta. Valletta: Midsea Books Ltd.Google Scholar
Zammit, T. 1915–19. Archaeological Field Notes: Notebook numbers 11, 12, 13, 14: 1915–19. Archive Manuscripts, Library, National Museum of Archaeology, Malta.
Zammit, T. 1927. The Neolithic Temples of Hagar Qim and Mnajdra, and the Miska Reservoirs. Empire Press, Valletta. Malta.Google Scholar
Zammit, T. 1930. The Tarxien Temples. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar