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2 - Introduction: Play as the Precursor of Ritual in Early Human Societies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2017

Colin Renfrew
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Iain Morley
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Michael Boyd
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2017

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References

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