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6 - Global Power Rivalry, Pacific Asia, and World Order

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 August 2023

Brantly Womack
Affiliation:
University of Virginia, Charlottesville
Wang Gungwu
Affiliation:
National University of Singapore
Wu Yu-Shan
Affiliation:
Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
Qin Yaqing
Affiliation:
China Foreign Affairs University
Evelyn Goh
Affiliation:
Australian National University
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Summary

The United States and China are the primary nodes of the multinodal world order. Together they are the middle third of the global economy, with the world’s biggest military budgets. Their parity makes rivalry inevitable because they are one another’s greatest counterpart. But their parity is asymmetric. China’s power relies on its demographic scale and on its Pacific Asian integration, while the US remains the center of the familiar global system that it created and it is the avatar of the developed world. While a Cold War is unlikely, the dangers posed by global rivalry are profound, ranging from nuclear war to failure to cooperate on global problems. The primary nodes also face asymmetric challenges. The US faces the challenge of adjusting to a central but not hegemonic global role. China faces the challenge of domestic tolerance and a mutually beneficial integration of Greater China and, more generally, of Pacific Asia. Beyond the primary nodes, regional reduction of uncertainties can contribute to the stabilization of world order. Cooperation founded on mutual respect is the prerequisite of successful global governance in a post-hegemonic world.

Type
Chapter
Information
Recentering Pacific Asia
Regional China and World Order
, pp. 200 - 232
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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