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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Bernd Kasemir
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Jill Jäger
Affiliation:
International Human Dimensions Programme, Bonn
Carlo C. Jaeger
Affiliation:
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research
Matthew T. Gardner
Affiliation:
Biogen Inc.
William C. Clark
Affiliation:
Harvard University, Massachusetts
Alexander Wokaun
Affiliation:
Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
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Summary

This first part summarizes underlying concepts and major insights of the research on public participation in sustainability science discussed in this book. In Chapter 1, Kasemir et al. argue that currently decision-making on sustainability issues in general, and climate policy in particular, is in a transition from taking first careful steps of analysis to preparing major shifts in socio-economic activities. This transition needs an improved integration of citizens' and stakeholders' views into policy making to be successful. Documented and tested participatory procedures, which integrate expert knowledge with views held by the public, are necessary. The IA Focus Group methodology, developed to address this need, is discussed, and major results concerning citizen views on climate change and energy use are summarized. In Chapter 2, Gough et al. then focus specifically on conditions for meaningful participation in such procedures. Their findings include that open-ended settings, in which both participants and moderation team steer the process together, may initially even increase scepticism, but in the longer run support the establishment of mutual trust and understanding. Also, the medium of interaction between lay publics and expertise in participatory procedures was found to be crucial. In most IA Focus Groups conducted in the research discussed in this book, computer models were an essential medium of this interaction. In Chapter 3, Jerry Ravetz suggests that such integrated models on global change issues face such high uncertainties that they can be understood to have a metaphorical rather than a predictive function.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Bernd Kasemir, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Jill Jäger, International Human Dimensions Programme, Bonn, Carlo C. Jaeger, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Matthew T. Gardner, Biogen Inc.
  • Foreword by William C. Clark, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Alexander Wokaun, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
  • Book: Public Participation in Sustainability Science
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511490972.004
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  • Introduction
  • Edited by Bernd Kasemir, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Jill Jäger, International Human Dimensions Programme, Bonn, Carlo C. Jaeger, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Matthew T. Gardner, Biogen Inc.
  • Foreword by William C. Clark, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Alexander Wokaun, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
  • Book: Public Participation in Sustainability Science
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511490972.004
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Edited by Bernd Kasemir, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Jill Jäger, International Human Dimensions Programme, Bonn, Carlo C. Jaeger, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Matthew T. Gardner, Biogen Inc.
  • Foreword by William C. Clark, Harvard University, Massachusetts, Alexander Wokaun, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland
  • Book: Public Participation in Sustainability Science
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511490972.004
Available formats
×