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Chapter 10 - Chemolithotrophy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2019

Byung Hong Kim
Affiliation:
Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul
Geoffrey Michael Gadd
Affiliation:
University of Dundee
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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  • Chemolithotrophy
  • Byung Hong Kim, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Geoffrey Michael Gadd, University of Dundee
  • Book: Prokaryotic Metabolism and Physiology
  • Online publication: 04 May 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316761625.010
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  • Chemolithotrophy
  • Byung Hong Kim, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Geoffrey Michael Gadd, University of Dundee
  • Book: Prokaryotic Metabolism and Physiology
  • Online publication: 04 May 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316761625.010
Available formats
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  • Chemolithotrophy
  • Byung Hong Kim, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Geoffrey Michael Gadd, University of Dundee
  • Book: Prokaryotic Metabolism and Physiology
  • Online publication: 04 May 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316761625.010
Available formats
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