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Chapter 1 - Professional Ethics in Medicine

from Section 1 - Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 November 2019

Laurence B. McCullough
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
John H. Coverdale
Affiliation:
Baylor College of Medicine, Texas
Frank A. Chervenak
Affiliation:
Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell
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Summary

This chapter provides a historical and philosophical introduction to professional ethics in medicine, based on the ethical concept of medicine as a profession.

In this book we provide an historical, philosophical, clinically comprehensive, and practical account of professional ethics in obstetrics and gynecology. The goal of professional ethics in obstetrics and gynecology is to identify what is ethically permissible, ethically obligatory, ethically impermissible, and ethically ideal in patient care, clinical innovation and research, organizational culture, and health policy and advocacy concerning female, pregnant, and fetal patients.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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