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Presenting the Romans Presenting the Romans
Interpreting the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site
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10 - Woerden – Hoochwoert (Dutch Limes): Showing the Invisible

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2013

Tom Hazenberg
Affiliation:
Netherlands
Nigel Mills
Affiliation:
Director, World Heritage and Access, The Hadrian's Wall Trust
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Summary

Introduction

In the Dutch city of Woerden, civil servants, local authorities, developers, enthusiastic citizens and archaeologists have succeeded, by working together, in revealing to the general public the city's invisible Roman past. There are several reasons for this success. The aim of bringing the Roman past to life through visual display was an integral aspect of an archaeological heritage management programme, and served a range of purposes (social, historical, educational and commercial). The framework that was built for presenting the city's Roman history concerned not only the hardware (pictures, displays etc) but also the people who use it, such as guides and teachers. All of this amounts to a considerable advance in bringing the invisible Roman past to life and in highlighting the importance and value of archaeology to the city. This chapter looks back on the path taken to realising the vision of Roman Woerden, paying special attention to the process and to key decisions made along the way.

The Woerden – Hoochwoert Project: Development, Research and Storytelling

Work has been ongoing since the 1990s to develop a new shopping complex around a yet-to-be-constructed square by the Church of St Peter (Petruskerk) in the centre of the typical Dutch fortified city of Woerden. The development included an underground car park designed to hold 560 cars.

Type
Chapter
Information
Presenting the Romans
Interpreting the Frontiers of the Roman Empire World Heritage Site
, pp. 93 - 102
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

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