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Chapter 5 - Sperm DNA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2022

David Mortimer
Affiliation:
Oozoa Biomedical Inc., Vancouver
Lars Björndahl
Affiliation:
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm
Christopher L. R. Barratt
Affiliation:
University of Dundee
José Antonio Castilla
Affiliation:
HU Virgen de las Nieves, Granada
Roelof Menkveld
Affiliation:
Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Ulrik Kvist
Affiliation:
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm
Juan G. Alvarez
Affiliation:
Centro ANDROGEN, La Coruña
Trine B. Haugen
Affiliation:
Oslo Metropolitan University
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Summary

Discusses the origins and detection of sperm DNA fragmentation, including cliniCal indications for such testing. Provides methods for a range of common techniques for assessimg sperm DNA fragmentation that are structured as standard operating procedures (SOPs) for easy use at the bench, inclding the TUNEL assay, Comet assay, and the sperm chromatin dispersion test (Halosperm test).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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