Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-mt5cb Total loading time: 1.215 Render date: 2022-11-27T13:38:37.872Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Section 9 - Infectious disease emergencies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2013

Kaushal Shah
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York
Jarone Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston
Kamal Medlej
Affiliation:
American University of Beirut
Scott D. Weingart
Affiliation:
Department of Emergency Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York
Get access

Summary

This chapter discusses the management of infectious disease emergencies that includes severe sepsis and septic shock. The clinical presentation includes hypotension, encephalopathy, acute kidney injury, cardiogenic shock, lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) is the mainstay of treatment of sepsis. Patients with persistently low blood pressure despite adequate fluid administration or whose resuscitation goals are not met require additional interventions. The risk factors for healthcare-associated infections that may be multidrug resistant are: hospitalization within the last 90 days, residence in a nursing home or long-term care facility, presence of indwelling catheters, intravenous therapy, wound care, or intravenous chemotherapy within the prior 30 days, and attendance at a hospital or hemodialysis clinic within the prior 30 days. Urgent surgical consultation should be sought when indicated by the source of infection (e.g. abscess, ruptured viscus).
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×