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Chapter 20 - Pruritus

from Section II - Signs and symptoms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2016

James W. Heitz
Affiliation:
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
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Summary

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Type
Chapter
Information
Post-Anesthesia Care
Symptoms, Diagnosis and Management
, pp. 145 - 151
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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