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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2009

David Colander
Affiliation:
Middlebury College, Vermont
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Post Walrasian Macroeconomics
Beyond the Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model
, pp. 369 - 400
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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