Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nmvwc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-15T15:41:27.616Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

12 - Other control measures and related topics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 December 2009

H. F. van Emden
Affiliation:
University of Reading
M. W. Service
Affiliation:
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The problems of the continued widespread use of pesticides, and particularly the absorption of the words ‘environmental pollution’ into common vocabulary, have caused scientists to look seriously at any ideas for pest/vector control which do not involve traditional insecticides. Although the preceding chapters have discussed those control approaches which have the widest general application, there are several other methods which are, or have been, in use or have been proposed.

In this chapter we bring together this variety of unrelated methods which do not warrant a separate chapter of their own. The ingenuity of mankind in inventing ways of tackling insect problems has led to a huge variety of such methods, and we cannot pretend we can make this chapter comprehensive.

We conclude this chapter on ‘Other control methods’ in a different vein – attempts legally to enforce control practices (‘Legislative controls’), and finally we raise some ‘Other topics’ which do not directly lead to the control of insects but which we believe are relevant to the topics covered in this book and should be included.

Physical methods

Such controls aim to reduce insect populations by using devices which affect them physically or alter their physical environment. Some may be hardly distinguishable from environmental or cultural controls and are frequently labour-intensive. For example, in the early days of pest control in developing countries, handpicking and foot-crushing of larger insects (e.g. caterpillars) was economically viable and effective.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×