Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-phmbd Total loading time: 0.836 Render date: 2022-07-01T18:44:00.268Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 7 - Gonadotropins in ovarian stimulation

from Section 2: - Ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2011

Mohamed Aboulghar
Affiliation:
Cairo University and the IVF-ET Center
Botros Rizk
Affiliation:
University of South Alabama
Get access

Summary

This chapter deals with different gonadotropin molecules in ovarian stimulation. Human menopausal gonadotropins consist of a purified preparation of gonadotropins extracted from the urine of postmenopausal women. In the natural cycle both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are required for normal follicular growth and maturation. The main risk associated with the use of FSH-containing gonadotropin products is the development of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). OHSS can be easily prevented by starting with a relatively low dose of gonadotropin, especially in high-risk women like young patients, those with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and those with a low body mass index (BMI). From the many randomized trials that have been performed it appears that all available gonadotropins are comparably effective and safe. The differences in isoform profile did not appear to have significant clinically significant effects in in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles.
Type
Chapter
Information
Ovarian Stimulation , pp. 61 - 66
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×