Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-gz6rp Total loading time: 0.382 Render date: 2022-11-27T07:05:30.938Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

7 - Orlando di Lasso and Rome: personal contacts and musical influences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2009

Noel O'Regan
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Peter Bergquist
Affiliation:
University of Oregon
Get access

Summary

The common use of the Italian version of his name serves to underline the important part played by Italy and Italian music in the life and work of Orlando di Lasso. His earliest adult musical experiences took place there in the 1550s and he paid frequent visits thereafter; he composed madrigals and villanelle to Italian texts and his music attained considerable popularity in Italy. This essay examines Lasso's relations with one important Italian center, Rome. Personal and musical contacts between the composer and the city occurred during three main periods: the early 1550s when, as a young man, he lived and worked there; the early 1560s when his compositions played a major part in an exchange of music between Rome and Munich; and the year 1574 when he revisited the papal city while on a tour of Italy looking for singers. The 1550s and 1574 provided opportunities for personal contacts with Roman musicians; as well as the 1560s exchange, evidence of musical contact also comes from Roman manuscripts and from contemporary inventories of music held at the city's institutions.

Of particular interest is the possibility of musical cross-fertilization between Lasso and Palestrina, the two major musical figures in their respective cities, who also coincidentally died in the same year. While there is no direct evidence of personal contact between them, these two composers must surely have known each other when they simultaneously held positions as maestri di cappella at Rome's two most important basilicas during the early 1550s.

Type
Chapter
Information
Orlando di Lasso Studies , pp. 132 - 157
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×