Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-c9gpj Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-15T23:59:01.152Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Section 10 - Ethics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 September 2022

Dimitrios S. Nikolaou
Affiliation:
Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London
David B. Seifer
Affiliation:
Yale Reproductive Medicine, New Haven, CT
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

The World Bank. Birth rate, crude (per 1,000 people). https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.CBRT.IN.Google Scholar
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NCHS – Birth Rates for Females by Age Group: United States. https://data.cdc.gov/NCHS/NCHS-Birth-Rates-for-Females-by-Age-Group-United-S/yt7u-eiyg/data.Google Scholar
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Obstetric Practice, Committee on Genetics, U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Committee Opinion No 671: Perinatal Risks Associated With Assisted Reproductive Technology. Obstet. Gynecol. 2016;128(3):e61–8.Google Scholar
Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Oocyte or embryo donation to women of advanced reproductive age: an Ethics Committee opinion. Fertil. Steril. 2016;106:e3e7.Google Scholar
Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Provision of fertility services for women at increased risk of complications during fertility treatment or pregnancy: an Ethics Committee opinion. Fertil. Steril. 2016;106:1319–23.Google Scholar
Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Child-rearing ability and the provision of fertility services: an Ethics Committee opinion. Fertil. Steril. 2017;108:944–7.Google Scholar
Calhaz-Jorge, C. et al. Survey on ART and IUI: legislation, regulation, funding and registries in European countries: The European IVF-monitoring Consortium (EIM) for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Hum. Reprod. Open 2020;2020:hoz044.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Klitzman, R. L. How old is too old? Challenges faced by clinicians concerning age cutoffs for patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. Fertil. Steril. 2016;106:216–24.Google Scholar
Grotegut, C. A. et al. Medical and obstetric complications among pregnant women aged 45 and older. PLoS One 2014;9:e96237.Google Scholar
Sauer, M. V. Reproduction at an advanced maternal age and maternal health. Fertil. Steril. 2015;103:1136–43.Google Scholar
Zweifel, J. E., et al. Is it time to establish age restrictions in ART? J. Assist. Reprod. Genet. 2020;37:257–62.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Harrison, B. J. et al. Advanced maternal age: ethical and medical considerations for assisted reproductive technology. Int. J. Womens Health 2017;9:561–70.Google Scholar
Kocourková, J., et al. How old is too old? A contribution to the discussion on age limits for assisted reproduction technique access. Reprod. Biomed. Online 2015;30:482–92.Google Scholar
Zweifel, J. E. Donor conception from the viewpoint of the child: positives, negatives, and promoting the welfare of the child. Fertil. Steril. 2015;104:513–19.Google Scholar
Pennings, G. Distributive justice in the allocation of donor oocytes. J. Assist. Reprod. Genet. 2001;18(2):5663.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smajdor, A. How useful is the concept of the “harm threshold” in reproductive ethics and law? Theor. Med. Bioeth. 2014;35(5):321–36.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×