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Chapter 15 - ‘Crash’ Caesarean Section

from Section 3 - Intrapartum Emergencies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2021

Edwin Chandraharan
Affiliation:
St George's University of London
Sir Sabaratnam Arulkumaran
Affiliation:
St George's University of London
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Obstetric and Intrapartum Emergencies
A Practical Guide to Management
, pp. 107 - 115
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Classification of Urgency of CS: A Continuum of Risk. RCOG Good Practice Guideline Number 11; 2010. www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/goodpractice11classificationofurgency.pdfGoogle Scholar
Betran, AP, Torloni, M, Zhang, J, et al. WHO statement on Caesarean section rates. BJOG. 2016;123(5):667–70.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Betran, AP, Torloni, M, Zhang, J, et al. What is the optimal rate of caesarean section at population level? A systematic review of ecologic studies. Reprod Health. 2015;21;1257.Google Scholar
Macfarlan, A, Blondel, B, Mohangoo, A, et al. Wide differences in mode of delivery within Europe: risk stratified analyses of aggregated routine data from the Euro-Peristat study. BJOG. 2016;123(4):559–68.Google Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Caesarean Section Consent Advice number 7. London: RCOG; 2009. www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/consent-advice/ca7-15072010.pdfGoogle Scholar
Thomas, J, Paranjothy, S. The National Sentinel Caesarean Section Audit Report. RCOG Clinical Effectiveness Support Unit. RCOG Press; 2001. www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/research–audit/nscs_audit.pdfGoogle Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. Obtaining Valid Consent. Clinical Governance Advice No 6. London: RCOG; 2015. www.rcog.org.uk/globalassets/documents/guidelines/clinical-governance-advice/cga6.pdfGoogle Scholar
Baskett, TF. Preparedness for emergency ‘crash’ caesarean section. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2015;37(12):1116–17.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
SGOC Clinical Practice Guideline. Surgical safety checklist in obstetrics and gynaecology. J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2012;35(1 eSuppl B):S1S5. https://sogc.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/JOGC-Jan2013-CPG286-ENG-Online.pdfGoogle Scholar
National Collaborating Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health. Caesarean Section. Clinical Guideline. London: RCOG Press; 2011. www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg132/evidence/full-guideline-pdf–184810861Google Scholar
Jeejeebhoy, FM, Zelop, CM, Lipman, S, et al. Cardiac arrest in pregnancy: a scientific statement from the AHA. Circulation. 2015;132:1747–73. www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/cir.0000000000000300CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abalos, E. Surgical techniques for caesarean section: RHL commentary. The WHO Reproductive Health Library. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2009.Google Scholar
WHO recommendation on routine antibiotic prophylaxis for women undergoing elective or emergency caesarean section (September 2015). The WHO Reproductive Health Library. Geneva: World Health Organization.Google Scholar

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