Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-rx7pk Total loading time: 0.446 Render date: 2022-10-07T04:11:57.642Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true
Object Categorization Object Categorization
Computer and Human Vision Perspectives
Buy print or eBook[Opens in a new window]

Book contents

24 - Neural Encoding of Scene Statistics for Surface and Object Inference

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2010

Sven J. Dickinson
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
Aleš Leonardis
Affiliation:
University of Ljubljana
Bernt Schiele
Affiliation:
Technische Universität, Darmstadt, Germany
Michael J. Tarr
Affiliation:
Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Visual scenes are often complex and ambiguous to interpret because of the myriad causes that generate them. To understand visual scenes, our visual systems have to rely on our prior experience and assumptions about the world. These priors are rooted in the statistical correlation structures of visual events in our experience. They can be learned and exploited for probabilistic inference in a Bayesian framework using graphical models. Thus, we believe that understanding the statistics of natural scenes and developing graphical models with these priors for inference are crucial for gaining theoretical and computational insights to guide neurophysiological experiments. In this chapter, we will provide our perspective based on our work on scene statistics, graphical models, and neurophysiological experiments.

An important source of statistical priors for inference is the statistical correlation of visual events in our natural experience. In fact, it has long been suggested in the psychology community that learning due to coherent covariation of visual events is crucial for the development of Gestalt rules (Koffka 1935) as well as models of objects and object categories in the brain (Gibson 1979; Roger and McClelland 2004). Nevertheless, there has been relatively little research on how correlation structures in natural scenes are encoded by neurons. Here, we will first describe experimental results obtained from multielectrode neuronal recording in the primary visual cortex of awake-behaving monkeys. Each study was conducted on at least two animals. These results reveal mechanisms at the neuronal level for the encoding and influence of scene priors in visual processing.

Type
Chapter
Information
Object Categorization
Computer and Human Vision Perspectives
, pp. 451 - 474
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×