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Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2013

Scott DeLancey
Affiliation:
University of Oregon
Gwendolyn Hyslop
Affiliation:
Specialist in the East Bodish languages of Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh
Stephen Morey
Affiliation:
Associate Director of the Research Centre for Linguistic Typology at La Trobe University
Mark W. Post
Affiliation:
Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Anthropological Linguistics at The Cairns Institute of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia
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Summary

When I first began research on Tibeto-Burman and Southeast Asian languages as a postgraduate student in 1975, North East India was a huge informational vacuum. Not that there was that much information to be had on Tibeto-Burman languages in general, but for the North East we had only the tantalizing snippets of the Linguistic Survey of India and a handful of colonial-era jottings. Of course, many years earlier the publication of the <I>LSI made North East India better documented linguistically than many other corners of the earth, and made early comparative work on Tibeto-Burman possible. But time moves on, and while the fragmentary and primitive documentation provided by the LSI and the efforts of enthusiastic but untrained missionaries and authors fueled the pioneering work of Konow and others, by the time I entered the field there was little more that could be done with the superficial documentation available. And this seemed likely to be the situation for the foreseeable future, since the region was generally inaccessible to outsiders at the time, and almost nothing was being done locally. For those of us outside India the valiant efforts of intrepid Indian linguists like K. Das Gupta and I. M. Simon gave us only tantalizing glimpses of the linguistic riches that someday might be available to the world of linguistics.

Type
Chapter
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Publisher: Foundation Books
Print publication year: 2012

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  • Foreword
  • Edited by Gwendolyn Hyslop, Specialist in the East Bodish languages of Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh, Stephen Morey, Associate Director of the Research Centre for Linguistic Typology at La Trobe University, Mark W. Post, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Anthropological Linguistics at The Cairns Institute of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia
  • Book: North East Indian Linguistics
  • Online publication: 05 May 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9789382264521.001
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  • Foreword
  • Edited by Gwendolyn Hyslop, Specialist in the East Bodish languages of Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh, Stephen Morey, Associate Director of the Research Centre for Linguistic Typology at La Trobe University, Mark W. Post, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Anthropological Linguistics at The Cairns Institute of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia
  • Book: North East Indian Linguistics
  • Online publication: 05 May 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9789382264521.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Foreword
  • Edited by Gwendolyn Hyslop, Specialist in the East Bodish languages of Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh, Stephen Morey, Associate Director of the Research Centre for Linguistic Typology at La Trobe University, Mark W. Post, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Anthropological Linguistics at The Cairns Institute of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia
  • Book: North East Indian Linguistics
  • Online publication: 05 May 2013
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/UPO9789382264521.001
Available formats
×