Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.28 Render date: 2021-12-07T11:11:19.782Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

6 - Loose Canons? Music and the Craft of Ecclesiastical Power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 August 2020

Andrew Kirkman
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
Get access

Summary

This chapter looks at the upper echelon of power in the church of St Omer, examining the system of patronage that controlled and regulated it and the ways in which that control affected the careers of musicians. It does this by means of a close examination of the careers of three well-placed individuals in the church’s governing chapter. Its primary focus is on Nicolas Rembert, canon and later dean, and a former singer in St Peter’s, Rome. Rembert was a consummate church politician who exercised his legal and political skill in Rome to provide canonries for prominent singers and support music by means of income from a St Omer canonry suppressed through his influence. His period as dean also saw the bringing-in of important musical figures including the copyist and celebrated composer Jean Mouton. The other two central figures in the chapter, both members of the Burgundian court chapel, show the close relationship with the ruling regional dynasty and the contrasting effects it could have on church personnel and politics.

Type
Chapter
Information
Music and Musicians at the Collegiate Church of St Omer
Crucible of Song, 1350–1550
, pp. 201 - 256
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×