Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-z9m8x Total loading time: 0.389 Render date: 2022-09-26T04:29:21.018Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

2 - Chemistry and Mineralogy of Molybdenum in Soils

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2009

Umesh C. Gupta
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Research Centre
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Molybdenum (Mo) is important in ecosystems as a micronutrient for both plants and animals. It can also accumulate in the environment in toxic concentrations. Molybdenum is used widely in industrial societies and is an important fertilizer element in some agricultural systems. Soil Mo averages approximately 1.0–2.3 mg kg–1 as a crustal constituent, making it 53rd in abundance (Krauskopf, 1979), but it can accumulate as a result of biogeochemical cycling to 300mgkg–1 or more in shales rich in organic matter. However, the common range of Mo concentrations in U.S. soils is 0.8–3.3 mg kg–1 (dry weight) (Kubota, 1977). In soils, Mo can be found in four major fractions: (1) dissolved Mo in soil solution (watersoluble), (2) Mo occluded with oxides (e.g., Al, Fe, and Mn oxides), (3) Mo solid phases [e.g., molybdenite (MoS2), powellite (CaMoO4), ferrimolybdite (Fe2(MoO4)3), wulfenite (PbMoO4)], and (4) Mo associated with organic compounds.

Numerous processes take place in soil solution, including plant uptake, ion complexation, adsorption and desorption, and precipitation and dissolution (Figure 2.1). As shown in Figure 2.1, Mo solid phases dissolve upon contact with water and provide dissolved Mo in soil solution. The free molybdate ion reacts with metals to form complexes and ion pairs in soil solution. Plants absorb dissolved Mo, mainly as, from soil solution. Removal of by plants disrupts the electroneutrality of a soil solution.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
18
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×