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Chapter 15 - Shock

from Section 2 - General medical considerations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Marc van de Velde
Affiliation:
University Hospital Leuven
Helen Scholefield
Affiliation:
Liverpool Women's Hospital
Lauren A. Plante
Affiliation:
Drexel University College of Medicine
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Summary

Obstetricians most commonly encounter shock in the form of hemorrhage, but it is important to realize that shock can be classified in several types, and correction of the physiological derangement can correct the dysoxia at the tissue level before shock becomes irreversible. Etiologically shock is classified into the following types: hypovolemic shock (i.e. hemorrhage in coagulopathy), cardiogenic shock (myocardial dysfunction in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and with toxins associated with septicemia), distributive shock (through activation of the systemic inflammatory response system), and obstructive shock (septic embolism). Therapy for cardiogenic shock requires restoration of adequate coronary perfusion in order to minimize further myocardial depression and necrosis. Anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions are clinically indistinguishable. The goals of management of anaphylaxis are interrupting contact with the responsible drug, modulating the effects of the released mediators, and preventing further mediator production and release.
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Maternal Critical Care
A Multidisciplinary Approach
, pp. 160 - 173
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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