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9 - Physiological ecology of carbon dioxide exchange

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

T. G. A. Green
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Waikato Private Bag 3105 Hamilton 3240 New Zealand
T. H. Nash
Affiliation:
School of Life Sciences Arizona State University Box 874501 Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA
O. L. Lange
Affiliation:
Julius-von-Sachs-Institute of Biosciences University of Wuerzburg, Lehrstuhl fuer Botanik II Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3 D-97082 Wuerzburg Germany
Thomas H. Nash, III
Affiliation:
Arizona State University
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Summary

Photosynthesis is used by autotrophic organisms to convert light energy into chemical energy for maintenance, growth, and reproduction. Heterotrophs have shown considerable agility in forming symbiotic relationships with autotrophs so that they obtain a reliable carbon source. The endosymbiont theory proposes that the chloroplast of eukaryotic cells evolved from photosynthetic cyanobacterium-like organisms which were engulfed by nonphotosynthetic cells, leading eventually to the evolution of algae and plants. Fungi have also developed symbioses, one being the lichen, an extrasymbiosis with photosynthetic algae and/or cyanobacteria, which, in many respects, appears to function like a single autotrophic “organism.” Its photosynthesis and respiration are complex biophysical and biochemical processes that will not be discussed here in any detail. We shall restrict our analysis to those aspects that are of ecological relevance, in particular carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange, which is the subject of this chapter.

On average, approximately 40 to 50% of a lichen's dry mass consists of carbon which is almost exclusively fixed by photobiont photosynthesis. Photosynthetic processes are vital for the existence, survival, and growth of the lichen. Energy-producing respiratory processes that release CO2 occur in both the mycobiont and photobiont, although the individual contributions of the symbionts to the respiration of the whole lichen thallus are not yet known. However, it is most probable that total thallus respiration mainly reflects the metabolic activity of the fungal partner (Quispel 1960).

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Lichen Biology , pp. 152 - 181
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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  • Physiological ecology of carbon dioxide exchange
    • By T. G. A. Green, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Waikato Private Bag 3105 Hamilton 3240 New Zealand, T. H. Nash, School of Life Sciences Arizona State University Box 874501 Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA, O. L. Lange, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute of Biosciences University of Wuerzburg, Lehrstuhl fuer Botanik II Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3 D-97082 Wuerzburg Germany
  • Edited by Thomas H. Nash, III, Arizona State University
  • Book: Lichen Biology
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790478.010
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  • Physiological ecology of carbon dioxide exchange
    • By T. G. A. Green, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Waikato Private Bag 3105 Hamilton 3240 New Zealand, T. H. Nash, School of Life Sciences Arizona State University Box 874501 Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA, O. L. Lange, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute of Biosciences University of Wuerzburg, Lehrstuhl fuer Botanik II Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3 D-97082 Wuerzburg Germany
  • Edited by Thomas H. Nash, III, Arizona State University
  • Book: Lichen Biology
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790478.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Physiological ecology of carbon dioxide exchange
    • By T. G. A. Green, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Waikato Private Bag 3105 Hamilton 3240 New Zealand, T. H. Nash, School of Life Sciences Arizona State University Box 874501 Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA, O. L. Lange, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute of Biosciences University of Wuerzburg, Lehrstuhl fuer Botanik II Julius-von-Sachs-Platz 3 D-97082 Wuerzburg Germany
  • Edited by Thomas H. Nash, III, Arizona State University
  • Book: Lichen Biology
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511790478.010
Available formats
×