Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-9q27g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-18T20:37:22.727Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 11 - Obstetric Haemorrhage and Retained Products of Conception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2022

Swati Jha
Affiliation:
Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield
Eloise Power
Affiliation:
Sergeants’ Inn, London
Get access

Summary

The claimant gave birth in hospital and following delivery of the baby the placenta and membranes were delivered by controlled cord traction. There was a placental cotyledon missing at the time of delivery of the placenta and it was claimed that a failure to act sooner resulted in a massive obstetric haemorrhage, resulting in shock and need for blood transfusions. This caused a prolonged inpatient stay for recovery and she experienced a severe adjustment disorder.

Type
Chapter
Information
Lessons from Medicolegal Cases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Improving Clinical Practice
, pp. 139 - 151
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Knight, M, Bunch, K, Tuffnell, D et al., on behalf of MBRRACE-UK. Saving Lives, Improving Mothers’ Care – Lessons learned to inform maternity care from the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths and Morbidity 2015–2017. Oxford: National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford; 2019.Google Scholar
Waterstone, M, Bewley, S, Wolfe, C. Incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity: case-controlled study. BMJ 2001; 322: 1089–94.Google Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RCOG). Antepartum Haemorrhage. Green-top Guideline No. 63. London: RCOG; 2011.Google Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RCOG). Prevention and Management of Post-partum Haemorrhage. Green-top Guideline No. 52. London: RCOG; 2016.Google Scholar
Glantz, C, Purnell, L. Clinical utility of sonography in the diagnosis and treatment of placental abruption. J Ultrasound Med 2002; 21: 837–40.Google Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RCOG). Placenta Praevia and Placenta Accreta: Diagnosis and Management. Green-top Guideline No. 27a. London: RCOG; 2018.Google Scholar
Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists (RCOG). Caesarean section for placenta praevia. Consent advice No. 12. London: RCOG; 2010.Google Scholar
Kamara, M, Henderson, JJ, Doherty, DA, Dickinson, JE, Pennell, CE. The risk of placenta accreta following primary elective caesarean delivery: a case-controlled study. BJOG 2013; 120: 879–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rahaim, NS, Whitby, EH. The MRI features of placental adhesion disorder and the diagnostics of significance: systematic review. Clin Radiol 2015; 70: 917–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Intrapartum care for healthy women and babies. NICE Clinical Guideline 190. Manchester: NICE; 2014 (last updated February 2017).Google Scholar
Patel, A, Goudar, SS, Geller, SE, et al. Drape estimation vs visual assessment for estimating postpartum haemorrhage. Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2006; 93: 220–4.Google Scholar
Begley, CM, Gyte, GM, Devane, D, et al. Active versus expectant management for women in the third stage of labour. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011; 11: CD007412.Google Scholar
Keriakos, R, Mukhopadhyay, A. The use of the Rusch balloon for management of severe post-partum haemorrhage. J Obstet Gynaecol 2006; 26: 335–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
B-Lynch, C, Coker, A, Lawal, AH, et al. The B-Lynch surgical technique for the control of massive postpartum haemorrhage: an alternative to hysterectomy? Five cases reported. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1997; 104: 372–5.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Edwards, A, Elwood, DA. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the postpartum uterus. Obstet Gynecol 2000; 16: 640–3.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×