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12 - Corrective Feedback and Good Language Teachers

from Part II - Classroom Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2020

Carol Griffiths
Affiliation:
University of Leeds
Zia Tajeddin
Affiliation:
Tarbiat Modares University, Iran
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Summary

Chapter 12 examines the effectiveness of corrective feedback as a tool in language teaching. The authors review different types of corrective feedback and key research findings, before presenting a study on the types of feedback used by an experienced teacher when interacting with students in communicative lessons.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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