Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-fnprw Total loading time: 0.395 Render date: 2022-08-15T05:01:24.699Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

2 - Becoming a communicator

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Get access

Summary

What the child can do today in co-operation, tomorrow he will be able to do on his own.

(Vygotsky, 1962)

In the first chapter we considered in broad outline what is involved in linguistic interaction. As we saw, successful communication is a collaborative enterprise, in which each participant in his turn as speaker constructs and encodes his message so that it both adequately conveys his intention and also orients to the informational needs and expectations of the hearer at that point in the conversation. At the same time, the hearer plays his part by drawing upon a variety of sources of information in the situation and his past experience in order to interpret and fill out the message that he decodes from the actual speech signal. In performing these tasks, both speaker and hearer engage in a number of interrelated processes: translating between personal experience and the semantic structure of their common language; encoding and decoding meaning intentions through lexical items in grammatical structures; and integrating the phonological, prosodic and gestural patterns by means of which the message is given physical realisation. These are the processes that the language learner has to master, and in this chapter we shall consider how the young child sets about this task.

Attempts to explain the development of language, however, are closely tied to the beliefs that are held about the nature of language itself and about the way in which it should be studied.

Type
Chapter
Information
Learning through Interaction
The Study of Language Development
, pp. 73 - 115
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1981

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×