Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-9qwsl Total loading time: 0.599 Render date: 2023-02-02T22:47:30.751Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

12 - The four Common Spaces: new impetus to the EU–Russia Strategic Partnership?

from PART II - Bilateral and regional approaches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2009

Alan Dashwood
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Marc Maresceau
Affiliation:
Universiteit Gent, Belgium
Get access

Summary

Introduction

One year before the EU accession of ten new Member States, the May 2003 Saint-Petersburg EU–Russia Summit launched the aim of creating four Common Spaces, namely a Common Economic Space; a Common Space of Freedom, Security and Justice; a Common Space of External Security and a Common Space of Research and Education, including Cultural Aspects. The Council and the Commission later confirmed the EU's intention to develop the Common Spaces concept as ‘an extensive basis’ for strengthening the EU–Russia Strategic Partnership. The central aim of this new framework is to reinforce the bilateral relationship on the basis of a mutually agreed agenda for further action. In this respect, the May 2005 Moscow EU–Russia Summit adopted a single package of road maps with approximately 400 points for regulatory cooperation.

This first manifestation of a joint, issues-based agenda – replacing the EU's 1999 unilateral Common Strategy – has opened a new chapter in EU–Russia relations. Possible linkages between different action points open up new opportunities for pragmatic cooperation and progress. The parallel conclusion of two bilateral agreements on visa facilitation, a long-standing Russian desire, and readmission, an old priority for the EU, illustrates the potential of this new approach. This observation, however, does not conceal the existence of numerous question marks surrounding the Common Spaces programme. A first major question entails the legal nature of the Common Spaces and the framework for the implementation of the road maps.

Type
Chapter
Information
Law and Practice of EU External Relations
Salient Features of a Changing Landscape
, pp. 334 - 359
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
5
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×