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11 - Language Trajectories in Childhood

The Nature and Drivers of Individual Differences and Their Implications for Intervention

from Part Two - Continuity and Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 August 2022

James Law
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Sheena Reilly
Affiliation:
Griffith University, Queensland
Cristina McKean
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
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Summary

Whilst child language research has a long history of the examination of developmental change, it is only relatively recently that research methods have been employed that allow us to understand the nature and drivers of individual differences in child language development across a population. This chapter presents findings from studies examining children’s language trajectories from early childhood to adolescence using data from epidemiological studies in which large, population-ascertained samples are followed prospectively. Findings from studies using epidemiological methods to examine individual differences in child language trajectories are identified, and how these findings can inform public health models of intervention, considering primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, is considered. First, the implications for the design of services for pre-school children (0–4 years) is considered. Key learning points to methods for targeting interventions and the identification of potential levers for language growth which could be harnessed for preventative intervention. The chapter then turns to language trajectories in school-age children (here 4–11 years) and discusses the identification of those most in need of additional support and examines what intervention and trajectory research together tell us about the best targets for interventions. Recommendations for services and priorities for research are then identified.

Type
Chapter
Information
Language Development
Individual Differences in a Social Context
, pp. 259 - 280
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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