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Appendix H - Modern Chinese Theatre Figures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2023

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Summary

Ajia 阿甲 (1907–1994) was the alias and professional name of Fu Lüheng 符律衡. A playwright and director, he was an important intellectual figure in Communist theatre reform, starting from his arrival in Yan’an in 1938 and culminating with his involvement in the revolutionary operas of the 1960s, especially The Red Lantern. He helped to create and institutionalize the role of xiqu stage directors (Xing Fan 2018, Chap. 9). For a summary of his theatre theory, see Liu Yizhen (1988).

Bai Honglin 白鴻林 (1920–1987) was a wusheng performer trained by his father. He taught martial stage movements to students of the “first kunqu class” [Appendix I] in Shanghai before moving to Henan to work in a yuju [Appendix J] troupe in 1958.

Cai Yaoxian 蔡瑶銑 (19432005) specialized in guimendan and zhengdan role types. Though graduating from the Shanghai school in 1961, she moved to the Northern Company [Appendix I] in 1979 where she became their leading dan during the 1980s and 1990s, often performing opposite Hou Shaokui. She won a Plum Blossom Prize in 1988.

Cai Zhengren 蔡正仁 (b. 1941), see Lecture 6.

Chang Xiangyu 常香玉 (1923–2004) was a yuju dan, known for her striking voice. Her performance of the woman warrior Hua Mulan 花木蘭 became popular nationally as a result of a 1956 film.

Chen Baichen 陳白塵 (1908–1994) was an author of fiction and huaju drama, now best remembered for his wartime satires. He became an important cultural official in the People's Republic of China (PRC) and produced patriotic plays such as Song of the Great Wind, which in 1980 was adapted for kunqu as Empress Lü Usurps the Throne.

Chen Furui 陳富瑞 (1904–1971) was a jing ju wusheng. After an acting career during the Republican period, he became a key wusheng instructor for the Shanghai Troupe in the 1950s.

Cheng Yonglong 程永龍 (1873–1946) was a jing ju hualian, especially popular in the Republican era for playing the Three Kingdoms hero Guan Yu.

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Publisher: Anthem Press
Print publication year: 2022

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