Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-jkwcl Total loading time: 0.381 Render date: 2022-11-28T09:54:48.704Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

9 - Business–government relations in modern Japan: a Tōdai–Yakkai–Zaikai complex?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2010

Koji Taira
Affiliation:
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Teiichi Wada
Affiliation:
Waseda University (Tokyo)
Mark S. Mizruchi
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Michael Schwartz
Affiliation:
State University of New York, Stony Brook
Get access

Summary

Analysis of Japanese business–government relations is facilitated if we accept a working hypothesis at the outset: that business and government in Japan are like two major divisions of a well-run organization – Japan itself. Although some versions of “Japan, Inc.” are generally considered extreme by many Japan specialists, there is no doubt that the Japanese have long accepted the concept of a “corporatist unity of government and business.” (kanmin ittai) for the attainment of national goals.

In this chapter, we intend to show how the personal networks and contacts of public officials and private business leaders render the formal structural distinction of government and business almost meaningless in Japan.

A simple model of the TYZ complex

In order to facilitate the interpretation and appreciation of detailed data presented in this chapter, we first offer a simple model showing how individuals with business leadership qualities go through life cycles and interact with one another in the management of Japan as a close-knit business-oriented society. Executive positions of leading corporations (the Japanese counterpart of “Fortune 500”) are occupied predominantly by graduates of Tokyo University (Tōdai) and four other prestigious universities (Kyōto, Hitotsubashi, Keiō, and Waseda). The graduates of these universities also dominate leading bureaucratic positions in national government. Bureaucrats retire early, and many join leading corporations. A great majority of these bureaucratic and business leaders originate in middle- and upper-class families.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intercorporate Relations
The Structural Analysis of Business
, pp. 264 - 297
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×