Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-5wvtr Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-24T06:35:04.607Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 28 - Vector and virus IPM for seed potato production

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 2010

Edward B. Radcliffe
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
William D. Hutchison
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
Get access

Summary

Potato is South America's greatest gift to world agriculture and human nutrition (Graves, 2001). A dietary staple of indigenous Andean peoples for eight millennia, potato was unknown to the rest of the world before the mid sixteenth century. Today, potato is the world's fourth most important food crop, after maize, wheat and rice, and is grown on a significant scale in more than 130 countries on six continents with annual tuber production exceeding 320 million tonnes (Food and Agriculture Organization, 2007). In recognition of potato's potential to provide food security and eradicate poverty, 2008 has been proclaimed International Year of the Potato.

In most production systems, potato is clonally propagated from “seed” tubers. Clonal propagation offers agronomic and genetic advantages, e.g. vigorous early growth, higher yields and consistent expression of desirable traits. More than 10% of world potato production is used to provide “seed tubers” for planting the next production season. Seed potato tubers can be infected with a wide range of pests and pathogens which may affect growth of the crop and health of progeny tubers. Thus, access to high-quality, disease-free seed potatoes has been described as “the single most important integrated pest management practice available to potato growers” (Gutbrod & Mosley, 2001). Seed potato lots can be downgraded or rejected for recertification for myriad causes from “varietal mix” to herbicide injury. However, aphid-transmitted, tuber-borne potato viruses far exceed all others.

Type
Chapter
Information
Integrated Pest Management
Concepts, Tactics, Strategies and Case Studies
, pp. 366 - 377
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

,APHIS (2007). Plant Health, Potato Diseases, Potato Virus Y Strains. Washington, DC: USDepartment of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Available at www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/potato/pvy_main.shtml.Google Scholar
Blanco-Urgoiti, B., Tribodet, M., Leclere, S.et al. (1998). Characterization of potato potyvirus Y (PVY) isolates from seed potato batches: situation of the NTN, Wilga and Z isolates. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 104, 811–819.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carroll, M. W., Radcliffe, E. B., MacRae, I. V., et al. (2008). Border treatment to reduce insecticide use in seed potato production: biological, economic, and managerial analysis. American Journal of Potato Research, 84 (in press).Google Scholar
Chrzanowska, M. (1991). New isolates of the necrotic strain of potato virus Y (PVYN) found recently in Poland. Potato Research, 34, 179–182.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chrzanowska, M. (2001). Importance of different strains of PVY in potato production and breeding program in Poland. In Proceedings of the 11th Meeting of the European Association of Potato Research, Virology Section. Havlíčkův Brod, Czech Republic: Potato Research Institute.Google Scholar
Crosslin, J. M., Hamm, P. B., Eastwell, K. C.et al. (2002). First report of the necrotic strain of potato virus Y (PVYN) Potyvirus on potatoes in the northwestern United States. Plant Disease, 86, 1177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, J. A. (2006). Identifying and mapping novel mechanisms of host plant resistance to aphid and viruses in diverse potato populations. Ph.D. dissertation, University of Minnesota, St. Paul.
Davis, J. A., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (2005). Soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura, a new vector of Potato virus Y in potato. American Journal of Potato Research, 82, 197–201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, J. A., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (2006). Effects of high and fluctuating temperatures on green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Environmental Entomology, 35, 1461–1468.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davis, J. A., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (2007). Resistance to green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), and potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), in potato cultivars. American Journal of Potato Research, 84, 259–269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bokx, J. A. & Piron, P. G. M. (1990). Relative efficiency of a number of aphid species in the transmission of potato virus YN in the Netherlands. Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology, 96, 237–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DiFonzo, C. D., Ragsdale, D. W., Radcliffe, E. B., Gudmestad, N. C. & Secor, G. A. (1996). Crop borders reduce potato virus Y incidence in seed potato. Annals of Applied Biology, 129, 289–302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flanders, K. L., Hawkes, J. G., Radcliffe, E. B. & Lauer, F. I. (1992). Insect resistance in potatoes: sources, evolutionary relationships, morphological and chemical defenses, and ecogeographic associations. Euphytica, 61, 83–111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
,Food and Agriculture Organization (2007). International Year of the Potato 2008. Rome, Italy: United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization. Available at www.potato2008.org/en/index.html.Google Scholar
Franc, G. D. (2001). Seed certification as a virus management tool. In Virus and Virus-Like Diseases of Potatoes and Production of Seed-Potatoes, eds. Loebenstein, G., Berger, P. H., Brunt, A. A. & Lawson, R. H., pp. 407–420. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibson, R. W., Payne, R. W. & Katis, N. (1988). The transmission of potato virus Y by aphids of different vectoring abilities. Annals of Applied Biology, 113, 35–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Glais, L., Tribodet, M. & Kerlan, C. (2001). Molecular detection of particular PVY isolates: PVYNTN and PVYNW. Proceedings of the 11th Meeting of the European Association of Potato Research, Virology Section, pp. 70–71. Havlíčkův Brod, Czech Republic: Potato Research Institute.Google Scholar
Graves, C. (ed.) (2001). The Potato, Treasure of the Andes, from Agriculture to Culture. Lima, Peru: International Potato Center (CIP).
Gutbrod, O. A. & Mosley, A. R. (2001). Common seed potato certification schemes. In Virus and Virus-Like Diseases of Potatoes and Production of Seed-Potatoes, eds. Loebenstein, G., Berger, P. H., Brunt, A. A. & Lawson, R. H., pp. 421–443. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halbert, S. E., Connelly, J. & Sandvol, L. E. (1990). Suction trapping of aphids in western North America (emphasis on Idaho). Acta Phytopathologica Entomologica Hungarica, 25, 411–422.Google Scholar
Hanafi, A., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (1989). Spread and control of potato leafroll virus in Minnesota. Journal of Economic Entomology, 82, 1201–1206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hanafi, A., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (1995). Spread and control of potato leafroll virus in the Souss Valley of Morocco. Crop Protection, 14, 145–153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrington, R. & Gibson, R. W. (1989). Transmission of potato virus Y by aphids trapped in potato crops in southern England. Potato Research, 32, 167–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrington, R., Katis, N. & Gibson, R. W. (1986). Field assessment of the relative importance of different aphid species in the transmission of potato virus Y. Potato Research, 29, 67–76.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hiddema, J. (1972). Inspection and quality grading of seed potatoes. In Viruses of Potatoes and Seed-Potato Production, eds., Bokx, J. A., pp. 206–215. Wageningen, Netherlands: Pudoc.Google Scholar
Hille Ris Lambers, D. (1972). Aphids: their life cycles and their role as virus vectors. In Viruses of Potatoes and Seed-Potato Production, ed., Bokx, J. A., pp. 36–56. Wageningen, Netherlands: Pudoc.Google Scholar
,Insecticide Resistance Action Committee (2007). IRAC Mode of Action Classification, revised and resissued, July 2007. Version: 5.3. Available at www.irac-online.org/documents/IRAC%20MoA%20Classification%20v5_3.pdf.
Kaczmarek, U. & Mosakowska, E. (2001). Interaction between strains of the Potato virus Y (PVYO, PVYN-type Wilga, PVYNTN) and the potato plants of two cultivars. Proceedings of the 11th Meeting of the European Association of Potato Research, Virology Section, pp. 18–20. Havlíčkův Brod, Czech Republic: Potato Research Institute.Google Scholar
Katis, N.Carpenter, J. M. & Gibson, R. W. (1986). Interference between potyviruses during aphid transmission. Plant Pathology, 35, 152–157.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kerlan, C., Tribodet, M., Glais, L. & Guillet, M. (1999). Variability of Potato virus Y in potato crops in France. Journal of Phytopathology, 147, 643–651.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kus, M. (1995). The epidemic of the tuber necrotic ringspot strain of potato virus Y (PVYNTN) and its effect on potato crops in Slovenia. Proceedings of the 9th Meeting of the European Association of Potato Research, Virology Section, pp. 159–160. Bled, Slovenia.Google Scholar
Lagnaoui, A. & Radcliffe, E. B. (1998). Potato fungicides interfere with entomopathogenic fungi impacting population dynamics of green peach aphid. American Journal of Potato Research, 75, 19–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romancer, M., Kerlan, C. & Nedellec, M. (1994). Biological characterization of various geographical isolates of Potato virus Y inducing superficial necrosis on potato tubers. Plant Pathology, 43, 138–144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, W., Zarka, K. A., Douches, D. S.et al. (1999). Coexpression of potato PVYO coat protein and cry V-Bt genes in potato. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 124, 218–223.Google Scholar
Mollov, D. S. & Thill, C. A. (2004). Evidence of Potato Virus Y asymptomatic clones in diploid and tetraploid potato-breeding populations. American Journal of Potato Research, 81, 317–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
,National Agricultural Statistics Service (2007). Quick Stats (Agricultural Statistics Data Base). Washington, DC: US Department of Agriculture. Available at www.nass.usda.gov/Data_and_Statistics/Quick_Stats/index.asp.Google Scholar
Nault, L. R. (1997). Arthropod transmission of plant viruses: a new synthesis. Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 90, 521–541.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Olson, K., Badibanga, T., Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (2005). Producers' Use of Crop Borders for Management of Potato Virus Y (PVY) in Seed Potatoes, Staff Paper No. P05–14. St. Paul, MN: University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.Google Scholar
Perring, T. M., Gruenhagen, N. M. & Farrar, C. A. (1999). Management of plant viral diseases through chemical control of insect vectors. Annual Review of Entomology, 44, 457–481.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Piche, L. M., Singh, R. P., Nie, X. & Gudmestad, N. C. (2004). Diversity among Potato virus Y isolates obtained from potatoes grown in the United States. Phytopathology, 94, 1368–1375.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Piron, P. G. M. (1986). New aphid vectors of potato virus YN. Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology, 92, 223–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Radcliffe, E. B. (2006). Use of non-chemical alternatives to synthethic pesticides in maintaining plant health in a clonally propagated crop: potato. Arab Journal of Plant Pathology, 42, 170–173.Google Scholar
Radcliffe, E. B. & Lagnaoui, A. (2007). Pests and Diseases, Part D: Insect pests in potato. In Potato Biology and Biotechnology: Advances and Perspectives, eds. Vreughenhil, D., Bradshaw, J., Gebhardt, C.et al., pp. 541–567. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier.Google Scholar
Radcliffe, E. B. & Ragsdale, D. W. (2002). Invited Review: Aphid transmitted potato viruses: the importance of understanding vector biology. American Journal of Potato Research, 79, 353–386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Radcliffe, E. B., Ragsdale, D. W., Suranyi, R. A., DiFonzo, C. D. & Hladilek, E. E. (2008). Aphid Alert: how it came to be, what it achieved, and why it proved unsustainable. In Areawide IPM: Theory to Implementation, eds. Koul, O., Cuperus, G. W. & Elliott, N. C., pp. 227–242. Wallingford, UK: CABI Publishing.Google Scholar
Ragsdale, D. W., Radcliffe, E. B., DiFonzo, C. D. & Connelly, M. S. (1994). Action thresholds for an aphid vector of potato leafroll virus. In Advances in Potato Pest Biology and Management, eds. Zehnder, G. W., Powelson, M. L., Jansson, R. K. & Raman, K. V., pp. 99–110. St. Paul, MN: American Phytopathological Society.Google Scholar
Ragsdale, D. W., Radcliffe, E. B. & DiFonzo, C. D. (2001). Epidemiology and field control of PVY and PLRV. In Virus and Virus-Like Diseases of Potatoes and Production of Seed-Potatoes, eds. Loebenstein, G., Berger, P. H., Brunt, A. A. & Lawson, R. H., pp. 237–270. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robert, Y. & Bourdin, D. (2001). Aphid transmission of potato viruses. In Virus and Virus-Like Diseases of Potatoes and Production of Seed-Potatoes, eds. Loebenstein, G., Berger, P. H., Brunt, A. A. & Lawson, R. H., pp. 195–225. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rowberry, R. G. & Johnston, G. R. (1975). Virus infection of potato seed stocks in Ontario under commercial insect-control practices. Canadian Plant Disease Survey, 55, 15–18.Google Scholar
Russo, P., Miller, L., Singh, R. P. & Slack, S. A. (1999). Comparison of PLRV and PVY detection in potato seed samples tested by Florida winter field inspection and RT-PCR. American Journal of Potato Research, 76, 313–316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sigvald, R. (1990). Aphids on potato foliage in Sweden and their importance as vectors of Potato virus YO. Acta Agricultura Scandinavica, 40, 53–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, M. & Singh, R. P. (1995). Digoxin-labeled cDNA probes for the detection of potato virus Y in dormant potato tubers. Journal of Virological Methods, 52, 133–143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, M., Singh, R. P. & Moore, L. (1999). Evaluation of NASH and RT-PCR for the detection of PVY in dormant tubers and its comparison with visual symptoms and ELISA in plants. American Journal of Potato Research, 76, 61–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singh, R. P. (1992). Incidence of the tobacco veinal necrotic strain of potato virus Y (PVYN) in Canada in 1990 and 1991 and scientific basis for eradication of the disease. Canadian Plant Disease Survey, 72, 113Google Scholar
Singh, R. P., McLaren, D. L., Nie, X. & Singh, M. (2003). Possible escape of a recombinant isolate of Potato virus Y by serological indexing and methods of its detection. Plant Disease, 87, 679–685.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Slack, S. A. (1992). A look at potato leafroll and PVY: past, present, future. Valley Potato Grower, 57(95), 35–39.Google Scholar
Sturz, A. V., Diamond, J. F. & Stewart, J. G. (1997). Evaluation of mosaic symptom expression as an indirect measure of the incidence of PVYO in potato cv. Shepody. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, 19, 145–148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taliansky, M., Mayo, M. A. & Barker, H. (2003). Potato leafroll virus: a classic pathogen shows some new tricks. Molecular Plant Pathology, 4, 81–89.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tamada, T, Harrison, B. D. & Roberts, I. M. (1984). Variation among British isolates of potato leafroll virus. Annals of Applied Biology, 104, 107–116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weidemann, H. L. (1988). Importance and control of potato virus YN (PVYN) in seed potato production. Potato Research, 31, 85–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whalon, M. E., Sanchez, D. & Duynslager, L. (2004). The Database of Arthropods Resistant to Pesticides. Available at www.pesticideresistance.org/DB/index.html.
Zhu, M., Radcliffe, E. B., Ragsdale, D. W., MacRae, I. V. & Seeley, M. W. (2006). Low level jet streams associated with spring aphid migration and current season spread of potato viruses in the U.S. northern Great Plains. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 138, 192–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×